Life on the creative side

Creativity in the studio

Photo transfer on wood to personalize your corn hole boards

So many exciting changes going on in  life right now.  As I mentioned in my last couple of posts my family is currently knee-deep in the process of opening up a restaurant in our little sea-side community of New Smyrna Beach, FL.  My talented daughter and her  husband, who has just completed his commitment to the Air Force, have moved back to help with the project, as has my wondering adventurer of a son. AND hubby and I have recently become grandparents for the first time –  awesome!

And into the mix comes my son-in-laws thirtieth birthday. A thirtieth birthday is reason enough to celebrate, but now is also a great  time to honor his military service to our country. So in addition to all the packing and unpacking, meeting with restaurant consultants, architects, landscapers, city planning… we throw in a party – why not.

ben's 30th bday at TW

More about the party later but for now I’m focusing on the gift my daughter made for her hubby –  corn hole boards. If you haven’t heard of corn hole, which I can’t imagine, it’s a game where two teams try to toss  bean bags (or in this case a corn bags), from some distance,  through a small hole cut out of their competitors  board. But my purpose for telling you all this  is really  to share the how-to process for doing a photo transfer on wood to personalize your corn hole boards.

You can buy corn hole boards and bags or make your own as we did.

Supplies needed

Corn hole boards (plain unpainted)

Images printed on Laser printer (image reversed) using the lightest weight paper possible

Matte gel medium (in painting supplies at your craft store)

Paint brushes (foam or bristle, we preferred a 3″ foam)

Bone (crafting tool not body part), credit card or plastic scraper etc. (used to flatten and get the air out when you adhere the image)

Rags and a bucket of water

Matte polyurethane

Drop cloth – it’s go’na get messy

Now comes the fun!

If you plan to enlarge the image make sure it has a high-resolution so that the image does not pixellated when it is enlarged. The picture will be placed  face down so if it has words or objects that would be effected if they came out reversed, you will need to plan ahead and reverse the image before printing.  You will eventually be rubbing  the paper off the board so use as thin a paper as will print, we used 24lb).  I must be  printed on a laser printer. Make a couple of copies, just in case – trust me, we were glad we had extras.

Let’s get started.

Cutting as close to the edge as possible, cut out the image.corn hole, cutting out the image

Put a drop cloth down under your boards.

Most instructions will say to paint a thin layer of the matte gel medium on the right side of the image then carefully position it face down,  on the surface of the board. However making a corn personalized hole boards, applying mediumwe found that the paper would curl and was difficult to handle so we ended up painting a medium thick layer of gel directly on the wood then placed the image face-down on top of the gel, but this only works if you know exactly where you want the image.  Make sure to wipe away any exposed gel before it dries.

With a bone or a credit card or a plastic scraper (our preference was the scraper) carefully press the image, rub out all the air bubbles and make sure the edges are down. Gently wipe off any access gel.

corn hole, drying transferNow the hardest step – waiting!  For you patient types, the instructions call for you to wait  6-8 hours for the gel to completely dry.  But, I’m sad to say,  I’m NOT the patient type, so out came the hair dryer.

It’s time for some  messy. Get your bucket of water and towels. You want your towel to very damp but not wet, if you tried you could still ring a bit of water out – very damp. Put the very damp towel on the top of the transfer until it is completely soaked, you will see the paper change color and look more translucent; it may take a minute or two (if you are using a large image work a small area at a time, you’ll see why in the next step.

Ready for your workout? Once the image is saturated you will need to rub off the paper.  We alternated between using our fingers and using a wet rag making personalized corn hole boards, rubbing off paperwrapped around two fingers to gently, but firmly rub and rub and rub and rub the paper. Be extra careful along the edge not to rub off the image. Right away  the paper sloughs off, but look close and you’ll see teeny little fibers still clinging to the image – they have to go. This can take a while.

When all the fibers have been buffed away you will be ready for a break, so take one while the image completely dries. If any pesky little fuzzies are still around, you will see them as the image is dries, you can moisten the area again and rub some more.

Once all the fuzzies are gone and the image is completely dry apply a coat of matte polyurethane and you’re done.

jet corn hole board

I wish I could share some pictures of the party but I was  having so much fun I forgot to take them!

 

 

 

 

 


Organic/Industrial chandelier

baby henry

While strolling through Brooklyn on a recent visit to see my daughter and my brand new grandbaby, we spotted a fallen limb from a large sycamore tree. It was lodged into the fencing surrounding the base of the tree and part of the sidewalk that had been heaved up by the expanding roots of the tree.  Although my daughter laughed as I pointed to the limb and said “We need that!” she not only worked it loose from the fencing but then carried it on her shoulder for more than ten blocks, back to her apartment.  I just want to note – strolling around with a large branch on your shoulder makes the normally aloof New Yorker  smile and engage in conversation.

found treasure, fallen limb

The branch had such a lovely organic shape and wonderful patina that we both immediately saw its potential for an amazing chandelier over their table, for which they have been in search.

Since hubby was due to arrive the following day we had him throw in some lighting supplies, including five Edison style light bulbs. Then a few days later…

dinning under the light

we were dinning under this beautiful  organic/industrial chandelier.

Finally we added a dimmer switch the chandelier could be adjusted lower for ambiance or raised higher for illumination.  Unfortunately we didn’t get good photos of the process but feel free to post any questions on the process  I would be happy to respond.

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Refurbished table with a sweet coastal charm

gold-leaf starfish for refurbished table with a sweet coastal charm

Rescued from the trash, now this refurbished table has a sweet coastal charm.Refurbished table with a sweet coastal charm

This  little black table had sat on my mother’s porch for years and was in pretty sad shape.  The legs were wobbly, trim was falling off,  the table surface was rotted and one of the legs was sticking up through the top. But the form was so lovely and the paint had a great chippy appeal. So when she asked my dad to toss it out, I was there to catch and rescue it.

littly wobbly chippy black table to be refurbished

I wanted to keep the original top but it was just to far gone. Once I accepted that the top was too far gone, and hubby promised to help me create a new one,  I turned  my disappointment into a search for a creative solution.

making a new top for little shabby black table

I knew I wanted to keep the chippy character of the legs and shelf  so the new top would have to play well its shabby base. Ultimately I decided to add a little contrast, creamy white paint crackled over a blue base-coat.

cream white crackled over blue for refurbished table with a sweet coastal charm

 To marry the new top to the old base I added some of the same blue and white to the base but leaving evidence of the original black.

dry brushed blue and white over chippy black paint on refurbished table

Then for an extra twist I stitched a border of blue yarn around the top. Finally I applied a large, free-hand starfish in gold-leaf and the sad little table was transformed into a new charming table with a coastal vibe.

gold-leaf starfish for refurbished table with a sweet coastal charm

starfish table

With a little creativity and work, the sad little rescue table was transformed into a lovely, refurbished table with a sweet coastal charm.

For more creativity check out:

twig study

be different act normal


Antique headboard repurposed into a beautiful creativity-board

creativity board made from antique headboard

Antique headboard repurposed into a beautiful creativity-board.

 creativity board detail with business card

While cleaning out her barn my sister found a forgotten old headboard in the loft. She thought I might be able to find a new “repurpose” for it; she knows me well.  I have been wanting a creativity center for the studio; a place to display creative inspiration and project plans. A vague idea had been percolating in my mind; a message board, but on a grand scale. The dusty wooden headboard was the right scale and had a graceful form, perfect for my creativity board.

antique headboard repurposed into a creativity/message board

With the help of hubby the found headboard was redesigned into a useful, lovely focal point in the studio.

hubby cutting out plywood for creativity board

Here’s how we repurposed an antique headboard into a lovely creativity board.

Using the headboard as the  template we cut 1/4 inch plywood into a smaller version of the headboard by trimming four inches off the pattern all the way around.

tracing headboard for template

hubby helping with creativity board 2

I placed a layer of quilt batting over the plywood and held that in place with a layer of burlap which we held in place with staples on the back side of the plywood.

cotton layer of creativity board

burlap layer on creativity board

Next we covered it with a vintage chenille bedspread, again stapled to the back. Staples were also used to attach the cotton string, snuggly but not taut, that we crisscrossed across the front, over the chenille. Where  the strings crossed each other, I stapled the intersection down into the plywood, creating a tuft. Then the plywood was glued to the headboard, which had been painted a soft white.

vintage button on creativity board

We applied construction adhesive to the back of the plywood, carefully centered on the headboard and weighted it down for several hours. To add strength we added screws through the back of the headboard into the plywood (making sure they did not protrude out the front side of the plywood. I finished the project with buttons over the intersections of the string.

jar of vintage buttons

Now the creativity board, hangs in the studio, covered with creative possibilities.

creativity board made from antique headboard

headboard repurposed into creativity board

I & E Button

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show and tell fridays

the shabby nest

craftberry bush link party

NewThinkPinkSundays_01131


Fun and unexpected container planters

Container plantings offers a fun  opportunity to add unexpected creativity around our homes and gardens.  I love to use discarded items like  cans, boxes, boots, birdhouses even old gourds. The creative options are limited only by our vision and willingness to be unconventional.  I look around at things with an eye for  color, scale, texture and a cavity that can hold  soil and plants. The process is easy,  if  the container doesn’t have a way to drain water, I  punch or drill holes in the bottom,  add a drain field by filling the lower quarter of the container with gravel or broken pot shards, then  I fill the rest of the container with  the  proper soil type, plant and enjoy.

 Air plants need no soil and add whimsy to a space.

glass orb hanging airplant planters

 Colorful wooden boxes make a great place to cluster plants…

vintage crate succlent table garden

indoors and out.

found container for porch planters

 Old garbage cans and  wheel barrels make fun and unexpected container planters…

rusty wheelbarrow recycled into garden planter

 as do old buckets and tubs.

2012-08-01_19-36-47_810

 Worn out birdhouses or feeders work great and add a little playfulness to a space..

vintage birdhouse planter

 Baskets are  classic containers but hanging them on an outside wall can be unexpected.

unexpected container planters

 Old crates are sought after for interior styling,  but this one was missing the bottom which made it perfect for my courtyard.

geranium planted in vintage wooden crate

  I love colorful labels and the paper on a can will last longer when sealed;  but sometimes I remove the label and simply  let the can rust.

colorful recycled tomato can planter

 I confess I sometimes buy a  products based on packaging,  if it can be creatively repurposed I want it.

succulents planted in colorful re-purposed olive oil tin

But sometimes a repurposable package is just a lucky extra.

bourbon box recycled into fun and unexplexted planter


Creative gathering: how to make paper

how to make paper

Hallelujah! Finally, my studio is restored and reclaimed! After months of repair and restoration, that threw my studio into disarray, I have my creative escape back.

 

cabin studio

 

I held a gathering to celebrate and the creative activity was paper-making.

 

how to make paper gathering at blue antler studio

 

Three of my five sisters – kindred spirits all – joined me in the celebration and the creative process of making paper.

 

making paper with kindred spirits in the studio

 

Having made paper with my small children, who are now ages 23-30 (admittedly a while ago),  I knew it was a simple, fun process. But I Googled “how to make paper” just to refresh my memory; it returned intimidating results with complicated, multi-step instructions. So I decided to turn off the computer and go with what I remembered about the process. After gathering supplies and putting on our creativity rings (a tradition among my sisters) we got started.

Supplies

Recyclable paper – torn or shredded (we had newspaper, junk mail, old magazines and paper bags).

Extra newspaper (blotting paper) and old towels – for blotting out water

An electric blender

Rolling pen

Chalk powder or crushed chalk pieces – for color

Flowers, leaves etc.

Water

Large container for water bath

A frame/screen sieve: This is a simple tool similar to what gold miners would use to pan for gold (the frame can be different sizes but need to be a few inches deep with the top side open and the bottom side covered with a taut, fine screen or sheer fabric) and must fit into the water bath container.

Hubby made a frame/screen sieve for each of us out of scrap 2×2 lumber and an old, torn window screen. For each sieve he cut the 2×2 lumber into two – 9 inch long pieces and two – 12 inch pieces (the size can be whatever you want and determines the size of the finished paper, but it must fit into the container used for the water bath).

Using glue, screws and the cut lumber pieces he constructed a simple, rectangular frame.

Then using the assembled frame as a pattern, he cut two pieces of screen, one slightly larger than the frame (which he stapled tautly across the bottom of the frame to create the sieve), the second piece of screen he cut to the size of the inner dimensions of the frame; on this piece he left 4×4 inch tabs on each end of the screen. The screen with the tabs fit snugly inside the frame/sieve with the tabs sticking up above the edge of the frame so we could use them to gently lift the paper out of the frame. (By using the extra screen with tabs to remove the newly made paper from the frame/sieve to dry, it allows you to make more paper with one frame more quickly: this step can be skipped and the newly made paper can be left in the frame/sieve to dry)

optional – creativity ring :)

 

making paper in our creativity rings

 

Step 1: shred recycle paper in blender adding enough water to make a thick soupy pulp (at this time you can add chalk for color, flowers or glitter etc.)

 

paper making using a kitchen blender

Step 2: fill water bath container with water

Step 3: place screen with tab inside the frame/screen sieve (make sure tabs are sticking up and out of the frame); place the frame/sieve into the water bath barely  submerging the screen; pour blended paper pulp into the frame/screen sieve until the screen is completely covered with a thin layer of pulp; gently swirl the frame in the water to evenly spread the pulp over the screen; at this point you can place pressed objects into the pulp, make sure there is some pulp overlapping the object.

water bath stage of making paper

 

beautifully embellished hand made paper

 

Step 4: lift the frame from the water bath, let drain and place on towel or layer of blotting paper and blot gently.

 

making paper using recycled newspaper

 

Step 5: using tabs on the screen gently lift the paper from the frame and place the screen with the new paper onto hard surface covered with a layer of blotting paper and cover with more blotting paper, gently roll with rolling pen (using no pressure) to express more water, then carefully peel off the blotting paper.

Step 6: carefully transfer the new paper to a drying rack with the newly made paper down and carefully peel away the screen with tabs.

papermaking, releasing from screen (2).JPG 2

 

We used another old screen as a drying rack.

 

making paper embellished with flowers and drying in the sun

It was a wonderful, creative gathering.

 

making paper gathering in the studio

And another moment for my collection.

Check out  the following link for more great sites full of inspiration

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Old Chair, New Look

Aren’t these lovely? One old chair, gets a new look with paint and vintage table clothe.

Old chairs to refurbish

I have to start by confessing that I am not an expert on upholstery, in fact I’ve never upholstered anything before.  I have made slip covers but never have I stripped naked a piece of furniture and re-clothed it in a new look – but there’s a first time for everything. So I started carefully  pulling off fabric.

striping down old chair to refurbish

I found old cotton/horse hair/straw stuffing, burlap, metal  upholstery grip-strips (my terminology, probably not the correct term) and springs inside of my old chair .

Inside of old chair to be refurbish

Stripping off the old was easy, deciding what the new would be was more difficult.

lovely collection of fabric

I’m kind’a vibing pom-poms.

lov'n pom-poms

Finally I decided on using a vintage tablecloth (a cutter one), a soft warm white paint and pom-poms.

old chair new look with paint and vintage tablecloth

Old chair, new look

Check out this blog for more creativity

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Lovely Quilt Cube Side Table

Lovely Quilt Cube Side Table:

Basic box store foam cube up-scaled into this lovely, rolling,  quilt-cube side table.

quilt cube

Another empty-nest leftover transformed from this-

quilt cube foam blockquilt cube rolling base

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

to this-

quilt cube in room

Scraps of vintage textiles camouflage tears and blemishes in the cutter quilt slip-cover

quilt cube detail

while pieces of salvaged wooden planks with lovely distressed paint make the base.

quilt cube on wheels

Simple wheels finished the project.

 

 for more inspiration visit…

1-Funky_Junks_Party_Junk_link_party.29-AM

vintage inspiration bif


Vintage Vibe For Box Store Shelving

Vintage vibe for box store shelving

. Vintage vibe for box store shelving

As an empty-nester I can verify that when  the chicks leave the nest they leave it far from empty. Each time one of our little darlings set out on their own, Hubby and I found ourselves the keeper stuff – unwanted, but wanted stuff; treasures of childhood, mementos of college days and  a menagerie of mismatched  furniture  usually in rough shape.  These shelves fall into the last category.

box store shelf update before

But after a little creative restyling they look like this…

box store shelf update finished

In fact they turned out so beautiful they were snatched up on the first day of my fall sale.

DIY:

Although the shelves were in good shape, they looked exactly like what they were, box store shelves. So I took sand paper to them and roughed them up enough so paint would  adhere. I then gave them a coat of a warm white paint and  sanded them again, taking off some of the white paint (more of the paint came off than I had intended or usually want, but this time it looked right so I went with it). Next step was to mellow the paint and any fresh wood exposed from sanding by coating the entire shelf with a dark stain (applied with a brush then quickly wiped off with a rag). Once it was completely dry I coated the shelves with a flat, clear sealer.

Meanwhile I took some vintage wallpaper I have been holding onto, cut it into strips as  wide as the inside depth of the shelves and  as long as the shelves were wide plus  and extra foot or so. With a  spray adhesive I covered the bake of the paper with fabric (I used remnants of old sheets) and trimmed the fabric to the size of the paper. This gave strength to the otherwise delicate paper.  I carefully wove the lined paper over and under the slates of the shelving. To finish I trimmed off the excess paper and secured the edges to the underside of the framing with furniture tacks.

This project turned out so beautiful,, I might have to make another with the remaining shelves in our keepers stash.

 


Lamp Love

vintage hankies repurposed into a lamp shape

Lamp love –

Lighting can create the mood but lamps can create the style!


Art Exhibit, NSB, FL

art exhibit at the nest new smyrna beach florida

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My art exhibit at the Nest was wonderfully exciting with a great turnout by the community.  There was lively entertainment, interesting wines and, of course, art to enjoy and purchase ( several paintings were sold).  I want to thank my friends and supporters for participating in the evening, I couldn’t have done it without you and I sincerely hope you had as much fun as did I.

Art exhibit at Nest NSB

 

 

 

 

 

 

Art exhibit Nest,NSB 2-15-13

 

 

 

 

 

 

Art exhibit at Nest NSB

 

 

 

 

 

 


Kathryn T Lundberg Painting Exhibition at The Nest, NSB

Painting exhibition, Art and Wine at The Nest, NSB, FL

Painting, Storm coming over Florida wet land, acrylic on canavas

I have exciting news for all my friends and lovers of art, wine and beer; there is a painting exhibition featuring my work in the sweet little beach  town of New Smyrna Beach, FL. My paintings will be exhibited February 15 at the Nest.  http://www.facebook.com/NestNSB?fref=ts . The show opening will coincide with a wine tasting event hosted by the Nest.

The Nest is a wonderful boutique housed in a compound of historic buildings and featuring an eclectic mix of unique new, vintage, collectible and hand crafted home furnishings and décor – and (this is the really fun part) – a lovely collection of wines by the glass and select micro brews. You can sip your wine or beer sitting at the bar nestled in the interior of the shop or take your drink outside to the beautiful courtyard, featuring impressive water and fire features.

I am excited and I’m looking forward to the event.  It should be lots of fun; wine tasting, live entertainment, light hors d’oeuvres and (tooting my own horn here) some beautiful paintings; all in a lovely garden setting.

 

 


Beautiful Vignettes

window vingette

Beautiful vignettes may be defined as small and pleasing but they have a huge impact on the pleasantness of a space. Vignettes accessorize my favorite spaces, indoors and out.

Vignettes brighten my rooms

fabric vignette

Texture, pattern and form create beautiful vignettes in everyday places…

 

vignette on kitch shelf

and creative choices for storage creates a lovely vignette in my kitchen.

 

fish vignette

Carefully arranged collections create a lovely vignette, like this school of fish over my TV cabinet…

 

vignette with baskets

and a collection of my dads handcrafted hickory baskets fill that awkward space above the fridge.

 

mantle vignette

An eclectic mix of vintage mirrors and seaside finds grace the mantle of our beach-side cottage.

 

vignette with painting

One of my paintings acts a backdrop to a seaside inspired vignette.

 

vignette with produce

Fresh produce and flowers from the garden create beautiful vignettes for the table.

 

Beautiful vignettes grace my windows, enhancing views both in and out.

window vingette

lovely looking out…

 

window vingette

and lovely looking in.

 Vignettes grace my gardens

garden vignettes

I love little unexpected touches in the garden.

 

garden vignette

Like the painting I used as a backdrop inside, one of my mosaics, tucked behind a collection of pots and plants outside, create an unexpected vignette in the garden.

So look around your home for opportunities to create beautiful vignettes and enhance the pleasantness to your own space.


Christmas Ornament Exchange

christmas ornament hand painted manger scene

Hand painted, glass, Christmas ornaments.

I love Christmas time.  Spiritually the season renews hope. Socially it revives much of humanity’s focus on peace and love.  For us creative spirits the season inspires the very act of creativity.   And finally I love the traditions: lights and decorations; Christmas trees, cookies, cards and caroling; making, giving and receiving gifts; and of course gathering together in celebration with family and friends .

christmas lights display

Last night many of favorite things about the season came together with an amazing menagerie of woman gathering for our annual Christmas ornament exchange. This get-together with my girlfriends is one of many gatherings and I look forward to it each year.  It has become my tradition to personally create the ornament I take for the exchange, and this year I was particularly pleased with my creation – a hand-painted glass globe depicting a manger scene.

christmas ornament hand painted manger scene

Other examples of my painted ornaments

hand painted glass christmas ornament folk art cabin scene

christmas ornament  hand painted glass, wedding dance

christmas ornament hand painted glass, kate in positano

christmas ornament, hand painted, tree hunt

christmas ornament, hand painted wedding dance

christmas ornament hand painted wedding dance


Love’n The Versatile Succulent

Ever since my daughter chose to use succulents in her wedding, I have been in love with these beautiful, durable plants.

succulent wedding bouquet

 

succulents as table decor

From bouquets, to planters, to the garden, even to the garden wall, their versatility makes them perfect for so many applications.

succulents in the garden

To add a splash of eclectic fun to my window, I recently used a colorful olive oil tin and re-purposed it into a sill sized planter. First I used a belt sander to grind off the top of the tin. Then using hot soapy water I cleaned the empty tin. Next, I punched a few holes into the bottom and filled it half way to the top with pea gravel, before filling it the rest of the way with a cactus potting mixture. Finally I added the succulents and finished by covering the soil with pea gravel.

succulents planted in re-purposed olive oil tin

Spread the love – plant some succulents!

for more inspiration check out the party…

collage 5-1-13 2

http://www.commonground-do.com/


It’s Just The Way Some Days Go

I’m on another painting retreat by the ocean; after all, I had a wonderfully creative and productive experience during my earlier retreat.  This time however, has been a bit more frustrating. For my first painting I chose to attempt something a little different, but after a few days of struggling to get it right,  I decided to set it aside – let it percolate in my mind for a while.

pelicans on a dock

Pelicans on a dock, acrylic on canvas board (it’s almost right)

 grabbing a fresh canvas I stared a new painting.

guy netting for bait fish

Netting bait-fish, acrylic on canvas (there will eventually be a net in this guy’s hands)

But once again I find myself struggling with the same ole’ frustrations; scale, perspective, color and composition. I guess that’s just the way some days go, so with a beach towel tucked under my arm and a glass of wine in my hand, I’m off to clear my head and refresh my creativity; an easy task with the ocean just fifty-two steps from the door.

fifty-two steps to the water's edge

Fifty-two steps to the water’s edge

I’ll keep you posted.


Living Succulent Wreath

Living succulent wreath:living succulent wreath

While my daughter Kate, of Twice Treasured, was visiting for Mother’s Day, she mentioned a beautiful living succulent wreath project she had recently pinned  on Pinterest.  She commented that sometimes she, like a lot of us, was guilty of pinning projects with the intention of doing them but then not following through.  This project, however, was so perfect for us that we decided to make  time and actually create this beautiful succulent wreath.

Supplies:
Two wire wreath forms
Medium gauge wire and wire cutters
Mat floral moss
Succulent soil
Succulents

Line one of the wire wreath forms with the mat moss

making a succulent wreath

Pack with soil (the moss should keep the soil from passing through the back of the wire

Gently work the roots of the succulents through the wire of the other wire form so that the plants are on the outside and the roots are on the inside

applying plants into succulent wreath

 Place the planted form on top of the soil form and wire them together working the  roots  into the soil

 Using your fingers, gently work more moss into the wire around the plants

constructing a succulent wreath

 Cut four-inch pieces of wire and bend them into  hairpin shapes. Press the hairpins into the wreath among the plants and moss to secure

how to construct succulent wreath

Water thoroughly and keep the wreath flat for a couple of weeks or until the plants have rooted then it can be hung vertically.

 succulent wreath

check out inspiring links over at Yesterday on Tuesday

http://yesterdayontuesday.com/2013/06/project-inspired-19/

 

 


It’s In The Frame

reclaimed pecky cypress frame

Using reclaimed pecky cypress, hubby constructed this beautiful frame for my painting of the fishing pier.reclaimed pecky cypress frame


Painting retreat

fishing the pier

For the  past few weeks I have been on a solo painting retreat at the ocean’s edge;  here are the results of my creative efforts.

Storm blowing over Florida wetlands, acrylic on canvas

20×30

Stormy day over Florida wetlands, acrylic on canvas

12×12

Locals fishing off a pier on a Florida river, acrylic on canvas

20×20

Old Florida along the banks of a gulf coast river, acrylic on canvas

18×18


A Pin Cushion Made From Fabric Scraps and Vintage Dish

pin cushion made from vintage table cloth and white dish

pin cushion made from vintage table cloth and white dishVintage pin cushion

Recently I had a friend mention that she didn’t have a pin cushion so I thought I would take a few minutes and make one for her.  Since she loves the shabby chic style and has an affinity for old textiles, as do I,  I thought repurposed materials would fit her style aesthetic. Using a little milk glass dish, some scrap from a vintage table-cloth, a stocking and a hand-full of cedar shavings, I created this sweet, shabby chic pin cushion.

This is such a simple project and no sewing is required!

The supplies needed: Scissors, rubber band, a piece of yarn or string, old nylon stockings,  fine wood shavings (you could use cotton stuffing instead but I like the feel, the old fashion quality and aroma of  cedar shavings), some fabric and a small container like my milk glass dish or tea-cup. (construction adhesive optional)

supplies gathered to make pin cushion

Cut the fabric into a large circle; size will depend on the size of the dish, but a nine-inch diameter worked for my smallish container.

stocking used to make pin cushion

Cut the stocking six or so inches from the toe and stuff the toe with wood shavings until you have formed a ball large enough to fill the container and tie off the opening.

making the pin cushion

Place the stuffed stocking in the center of the fabric circle and wrap the fabric up and around the stocking ball, pull it taut and tie off tail using the rubber band. Tie off again using the string or yarn.

 making pin cushionfabric tied around filling of pin cushion

 Fan out the fabric;  smoothing and pulling it evenly back over the bottom of the ball. Wedge the ball into the container, a dab of good glue such as construction adhesive will hold it securely.

white dish used to make pin cushion

And you will have created a lovely little pin cushion

pin cushion made from vintage table cloth and white dish

Now gather up the supplies and surprise some special with a unique pin cushion.

for more great inspiration visit

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Architectural Salvage

My hubby and I recently attended a lovely, out-of-town wedding.  Since we were there for the weekend we had some time to spend with each other; and hubby surprised me with the perfect outing – a trip to an architectural salvage yard. It was a wonderful surprise and we had a great time: I even found a few treasures (imagine that).

archictectural salvage yard

After spending the morning digging through pieces and remnants of the past, we drove to the wedding with treasures poking out of the trunk, tied down with twine, and filling the back seat of my car.  We got a few stares, laughs and Beverly Hillbilly comments, but of course no one who knew us was surprised.

rusty metal candle sconce for garden accent

A rusty metal candle sconce. I think this will work great in my garden.

large paper dispenser

 I’ve needed a large paper roll dispenser at the studio for some time; now I have one.

amazing patina on old mirror

I love, love, love this old mirror; it has the most wonderful patina.

patina detail on old mirror

Here is a detail of the beautiful patina; see why I love it.

top of old wooden wheeled cartwheels for salvaged cart

And finally the most exciting find of all, an old (rotting), wooden  cart on wheels; well it’s not quit on wheels yet, but it will be once restored and then it will make a great coffee table in the cabin: So excited.


Better With Time

gladys at the quilt frame

quilting

It wasn’t long ago I was visiting my mom on a cold winter day when she pulled out a long ignored quilt top that she wanted to finish. As we were looking it over we discovered that it was missing one side of a border, which presented a dilemma.  Mom no longer had the fabric she had used when she started the top, but we soon came up with a solution which began a search through the beautiful collection of fabric she has preserved over the years.

 mom's collection of quilt fabric

During the search I came upon a small scrap of fabric that I fell in love with and immediately knew I wanted to do something creative with it; so I set the scrap aside for the moment and continued to help mom with her project.

fabric sample recycled

The calling to do something with that small piece of fabric would be realized a few days later at my Dad’s barn.

Dad has transformed the old barn, used in years past to house livestock that helped support our family, into junk/treasure storage.

While some may see a lot of “junk” in Dad’s barn, we on the ridge see mostly treasures.  Dad was helping me gather some old mason jars, for another project stirring around in my head, when on the far back wall I spotted it; an old frame covered in the dust of time.It took both me and Dad moving boxes, hand saws and standing on whatever I could to rescue the fame from its hiding place, but once I had it in my hands I knew it would be perfect for that beautiful scrap of fabric I had been holding on to.

 Dad thought it was in too rough of shape but I knew it would be fine. The finish had lost a lot of its shine, it had chips here and there and a white wash from a previous era was flaking off, but the beauty was still there, even enhanced.

old salvaged frame

The frame and fabric have now been put together and I can only describe the marriage of the two as a piece of art, of history, and a poignant reminder of time moving on.

old frame with salvaged fabric

Through this creative journey I came to realize that the faded fabric and tarnished frame are much like the two special people from whom I had gotten them,  a little worn by time, a few chips and nicks here and there but more beautiful  than ever after over 65 years together.

This post was contributed by my sister: Thanks Edna for sharing your inspiration and insight.

 


Success At The Antique Fair!

wardrobe display at renninger's setup

our renninger's booth staged and ready for buyers

Our first big sale at a retail venue was a great success. We sold a lot of merchandise and had a great time. It was however a lot of work and we couldn’t have gotten through the loading and unloading and running back and forth without my hubby’s unfailing support; he was our truck driver, our delivery guy, our fix it if it got broken guy, our deal with grumpy neighbors guy, he did it all. Thanks hubby!

setting up our booth at renninger's 1/12

hubby helping with setup

Many of the folks that stopped by our booth asked about our shop location and our plans for future shows, and of course we had neither, but we did direct them here to Blueantlerstudio.com; so if you are one of our new creative friends, welcome. Many of our buyers encouraged our creativity and urged us to considered doing more shows, but we’ll see. After a little down time Lisa and I will decide what direction, if any, we would like to take and, of course, once we have decided, you all will be the first to know.

running low on merchandise at the renninger's extravaganza

merchandise at the extravaganza

beautiful heart pine table and table top wine rack

Most of the items featured in the following photos sold!

most of the things in this photo sold!

all the jars and the wire stand sold

items that sold at the extravaganza

kathy and lisa in renningers booth


Wow Our Booth At The Antique Extravaganza Looks Amazing!

Wow! What a great weekend, hot but great, we are having at the extravaganza.  We sold so much stuff on Friday that after we closed up for the day we rushed home and picked everything we could from our homes to refill the booth space; then today went even better! But as for our grumpy neighbor, yesterday he proved that my theory that he was nicer than his first impression was wrong. But we are having too much fun, and sangria, to let a grumpy old guy bring down our spirits.

Today we met some great folks, dealers, collectors and delightful young people.  We also had some friends stop by for a visit, a little shopping and a sip of sangria.


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