Life on the creative side

Life on the creative side

Third Wave Café & Wine Bar

third wave cafe

We have been so busy with bringing our vision for Third Wave  to fruition , that I have seriously neglected my posting.  However I has been  a great time, the project has been an amazing  outlet for my family’s creativity.  Hubby has created some of his best wood projects, the kids and I have had a blast designing the space and ambiance – we left the food up to the professional – Chef Bruno.

  third wave

  Third Wave

third wave cafe

Stop by the site and take a look around

www.thirdwavensb.com


Photo transfer on wood to personalize your corn hole boards

So many exciting changes going on in  life right now.  As I mentioned in my last couple of posts my family is currently knee-deep in the process of opening up a restaurant in our little sea-side community of New Smyrna Beach, FL.  My talented daughter and her  husband, who has just completed his commitment to the Air Force, have moved back to help with the project, as has my wondering adventurer of a son. AND hubby and I have recently become grandparents for the first time –  awesome!

And into the mix comes my son-in-laws thirtieth birthday. A thirtieth birthday is reason enough to celebrate, but now is also a great  time to honor his military service to our country. So in addition to all the packing and unpacking, meeting with restaurant consultants, architects, landscapers, city planning… we throw in a party – why not.

ben's 30th bday at TW

More about the party later but for now I’m focusing on the gift my daughter made for her hubby –  corn hole boards. If you haven’t heard of corn hole, which I can’t imagine, it’s a game where two teams try to toss  bean bags (or in this case a corn bags), from some distance,  through a small hole cut out of their competitors  board. But my purpose for telling you all this  is really  to share the how-to process for doing a photo transfer on wood to personalize your corn hole boards.

You can buy corn hole boards and bags or make your own as we did.

Supplies needed

Corn hole boards (plain unpainted)

Images printed on Laser printer (image reversed) using the lightest weight paper possible

Matte gel medium (in painting supplies at your craft store)

Paint brushes (foam or bristle, we preferred a 3″ foam)

Bone (crafting tool not body part), credit card or plastic scraper etc. (used to flatten and get the air out when you adhere the image)

Rags and a bucket of water

Matte polyurethane

Drop cloth – it’s go’na get messy

Now comes the fun!

If you plan to enlarge the image make sure it has a high-resolution so that the image does not pixellated when it is enlarged. The picture will be placed  face down so if it has words or objects that would be effected if they came out reversed, you will need to plan ahead and reverse the image before printing.  You will eventually be rubbing  the paper off the board so use as thin a paper as will print, we used 24lb).  I must be  printed on a laser printer. Make a couple of copies, just in case – trust me, we were glad we had extras.

Let’s get started.

Cutting as close to the edge as possible, cut out the image.corn hole, cutting out the image

Put a drop cloth down under your boards.

Most instructions will say to paint a thin layer of the matte gel medium on the right side of the image then carefully position it face down,  on the surface of the board. However making a corn personalized hole boards, applying mediumwe found that the paper would curl and was difficult to handle so we ended up painting a medium thick layer of gel directly on the wood then placed the image face-down on top of the gel, but this only works if you know exactly where you want the image.  Make sure to wipe away any exposed gel before it dries.

With a bone or a credit card or a plastic scraper (our preference was the scraper) carefully press the image, rub out all the air bubbles and make sure the edges are down. Gently wipe off any access gel.

corn hole, drying transferNow the hardest step – waiting!  For you patient types, the instructions call for you to wait  6-8 hours for the gel to completely dry.  But, I’m sad to say,  I’m NOT the patient type, so out came the hair dryer.

It’s time for some  messy. Get your bucket of water and towels. You want your towel to very damp but not wet, if you tried you could still ring a bit of water out – very damp. Put the very damp towel on the top of the transfer until it is completely soaked, you will see the paper change color and look more translucent; it may take a minute or two (if you are using a large image work a small area at a time, you’ll see why in the next step.

Ready for your workout? Once the image is saturated you will need to rub off the paper.  We alternated between using our fingers and using a wet rag making personalized corn hole boards, rubbing off paperwrapped around two fingers to gently, but firmly rub and rub and rub and rub the paper. Be extra careful along the edge not to rub off the image. Right away  the paper sloughs off, but look close and you’ll see teeny little fibers still clinging to the image – they have to go. This can take a while.

When all the fibers have been buffed away you will be ready for a break, so take one while the image completely dries. If any pesky little fuzzies are still around, you will see them as the image is dries, you can moisten the area again and rub some more.

Once all the fuzzies are gone and the image is completely dry apply a coat of matte polyurethane and you’re done.

jet corn hole board

I wish I could share some pictures of the party but I was  having so much fun I forgot to take them!

 

 

 

 

 


Third Wave, garden café and wine bar

The  gardens of Third Wave, garden café and wine bar

garden space for bean barley & vine NSB Fl eclectic mix of industrial, vintage, repurposed and organic

Collecting inspiration for the gardens of Third Wave, garden café and wine bar in NSB, Fl


Third Wave, garden cafe and wine bar

creating  a unique garden café and wine bar:

I love my crazy creative family; from my parents who instilled in my siblings and me the preciousness of family, to my brothers and sisters who share and encourage my  joy of creativity, to my children who continually remind me that life is an adventurous gift.  On that note I have an announcement… drum roll please… Hubby and I, along with the prodding.. umm I mean support, of our children are opening a  garden café and wine bar. Third Wave Café  will be  near the sea in our beloved NSB.

I am of course very excited about creating the design and atmosphere that will be the Third Wave and have started a creativity board for inspiration.

Inspiration for Inside the beach cottage where Third Wave, will serve up delicious coffee and crepes

Bean Barley & Vine, garden cafe and wine bar, NSB, FL

 French inspired café chair for industrial touch…

french cafe chairRepurposed furniture and paint…

teal  table base

Chalk boards (fun and unexpected uses)…

chalk board info board

A touch of vintage…

sofa (go girl shoppe)But updated with modern textile…

sofa fabric swatches

And some whimsy…

vintage flamingo vase mermaid face

Be sure to stop back by, I’ll be posting the crazy, creative process of bringing our vision of  Third Wave Café  to life.


Making hot sauce

Thanks to the fruits of my labor, or in this case the peppers, my pantry shelves are nicely stocked with delicious hot sauce.

hot peppers from the garden

Kathy’s Hot sauce recipe

pepper harvest

1 cup bell peppers (more bell peppers make a milder hot sauce, less makes a hotter sauce)
7 jalapeño, roasted and seeded
7 cayenne peppers, roasted and seeded
5 hot banana peppers, seeded
16 oz. tomato purée
1/2 yellow onion
1-2 cloves garlic
2 Tablespoon salt
6 Tablespoon cider vinegar
1 Tablespoon crushed red pepper flakes
heavy splash of bourbon
canning jars

protective wear (hot peppers are HOT)

Sterilize jars and lids
Halve and seed the jalapeño and cayenne then roast, skin up, until tender in a 350 degree oven
Seed the remaining peppers
Place all ingredients, except Bourbon, into a blender and blend until all large chunks are gone (add water sparingly if necessary for blending).
Bring to a simmer in a sauce pan stir in a healthy splash of bourbon and remove from heat.

Ladle hot sauce into hot sterile jars and place on lids (let stand undisturbed until cool and the lids have sealed.

jars of hot sauce

 

 

 


Sisters glamping weekend on the Ridge

After months of planning and countless yard sale outings in search of glamping supplies, we were finally  ready for our sisterhood glamping weekend on the Ridge.

sisters glamping weekend

Even through we had a one day rain delay, we quickly regrouped and with the help of my wonderful hubby and brother, and the inspiring spirits of the beautiful woman gathered, the weekend was an amazing sisterhood bonding and celebration extravaganza!

We began our sisters glamping weekend with breakfast at my mothers, breakfast wraps and fried sweet potatoes – yum!

breakfast and granny glampers

While we lingered around my mother’s table, the guys, hubby and brother, sat up our canopies and beds: my brother-in-laws also helped out with chopped fire wood and a full cistern  – we have some great guys on the ridge!

2 building camp

Then the glamping began!!!

6 glamping time

Sheers and colorful tablecloths became tent walls.

jane constructing her tent

Then right before our eyes a collection of unique glamping personalities formed in the kaleidoscope of color and texture as we styled our weekend homes.

13 glamping in red

11 bohemiem glamper

33 glamper

10 a Diana in her tent

8 janes tent 1

7 b glamping artist vibe

Over the course of the weekend we crafted, hiked, shared, dined, toasted, laughed, cried, sang and danced; strengthening our bonds of sisterhood.


Organic/Industrial chandelier

baby henry

While strolling through Brooklyn on a recent visit to see my daughter and my brand new grandbaby, we spotted a fallen limb from a large sycamore tree. It was lodged into the fencing surrounding the base of the tree and part of the sidewalk that had been heaved up by the expanding roots of the tree.  Although my daughter laughed as I pointed to the limb and said “We need that!” she not only worked it loose from the fencing but then carried it on her shoulder for more than ten blocks, back to her apartment.  I just want to note – strolling around with a large branch on your shoulder makes the normally aloof New Yorker  smile and engage in conversation.

found treasure, fallen limb

The branch had such a lovely organic shape and wonderful patina that we both immediately saw its potential for an amazing chandelier over their table, for which they have been in search.

Since hubby was due to arrive the following day we had him throw in some lighting supplies, including five Edison style light bulbs. Then a few days later…

dinning under the light

we were dinning under this beautiful  organic/industrial chandelier.

Finally we added a dimmer switch the chandelier could be adjusted lower for ambiance or raised higher for illumination.  Unfortunately we didn’t get good photos of the process but feel free to post any questions on the process  I would be happy to respond.

2013-Shab-Friday-logo3

 

 blogpic2-1 (2)


A neighbor’s generosity brings blackberries back to my garden on the ridge

Blackberries

blackberries from Ray

Thanks to a neighbor’s generosity, blackberries grow once again in my garden on the ridge. I have always loved  blackberries, they populate  my childhood memories as well as those of my children. We  enjoying making jelly and it became a traditional summer activity  with my kids. The sweet-tart berries were the first plants in my ridge garden.  But a few years ago I lost all my blackberry bushes.  Then last fall I mentioned in passing  to a neighbor that I missed my blackberries.  Well the word spread along the ridge until it reached Ray, a life-long neighbor and friend, who this spring deposited twenty blackberry transplants from his garden on my front porch – I love life on the ridge.

Creating a blackberry patch

 

Blue bird house in blackberry patch

 

first blackberries on the vine

The transplants are doing well.  I’ll be sure to share some fav recipes at harvest time.


Antique headboard repurposed into a beautiful creativity-board

creativity board made from antique headboard

Antique headboard repurposed into a beautiful creativity-board.

 creativity board detail with business card

While cleaning out her barn my sister found a forgotten old headboard in the loft. She thought I might be able to find a new “repurpose” for it; she knows me well.  I have been wanting a creativity center for the studio; a place to display creative inspiration and project plans. A vague idea had been percolating in my mind; a message board, but on a grand scale. The dusty wooden headboard was the right scale and had a graceful form, perfect for my creativity board.

antique headboard repurposed into a creativity/message board

With the help of hubby the found headboard was redesigned into a useful, lovely focal point in the studio.

hubby cutting out plywood for creativity board

Here’s how we repurposed an antique headboard into a lovely creativity board.

Using the headboard as the  template we cut 1/4 inch plywood into a smaller version of the headboard by trimming four inches off the pattern all the way around.

tracing headboard for template

hubby helping with creativity board 2

I placed a layer of quilt batting over the plywood and held that in place with a layer of burlap which we held in place with staples on the back side of the plywood.

cotton layer of creativity board

burlap layer on creativity board

Next we covered it with a vintage chenille bedspread, again stapled to the back. Staples were also used to attach the cotton string, snuggly but not taut, that we crisscrossed across the front, over the chenille. Where  the strings crossed each other, I stapled the intersection down into the plywood, creating a tuft. Then the plywood was glued to the headboard, which had been painted a soft white.

vintage button on creativity board

We applied construction adhesive to the back of the plywood, carefully centered on the headboard and weighted it down for several hours. To add strength we added screws through the back of the headboard into the plywood (making sure they did not protrude out the front side of the plywood. I finished the project with buttons over the intersections of the string.

jar of vintage buttons

Now the creativity board, hangs in the studio, covered with creative possibilities.

creativity board made from antique headboard

headboard repurposed into creativity board

I & E Button

2013-Shab-Friday-logo3

show and tell fridays

the shabby nest

craftberry bush link party

NewThinkPinkSundays_01131


Fun and unexpected container planters

Container plantings offers a fun  opportunity to add unexpected creativity around our homes and gardens.  I love to use discarded items like  cans, boxes, boots, birdhouses even old gourds. The creative options are limited only by our vision and willingness to be unconventional.  I look around at things with an eye for  color, scale, texture and a cavity that can hold  soil and plants. The process is easy,  if  the container doesn’t have a way to drain water, I  punch or drill holes in the bottom,  add a drain field by filling the lower quarter of the container with gravel or broken pot shards, then  I fill the rest of the container with  the  proper soil type, plant and enjoy.

 Air plants need no soil and add whimsy to a space.

glass orb hanging airplant planters

 Colorful wooden boxes make a great place to cluster plants…

vintage crate succlent table garden

indoors and out.

found container for porch planters

 Old garbage cans and  wheel barrels make fun and unexpected container planters…

rusty wheelbarrow recycled into garden planter

 as do old buckets and tubs.

2012-08-01_19-36-47_810

 Worn out birdhouses or feeders work great and add a little playfulness to a space..

vintage birdhouse planter

 Baskets are  classic containers but hanging them on an outside wall can be unexpected.

unexpected container planters

 Old crates are sought after for interior styling,  but this one was missing the bottom which made it perfect for my courtyard.

geranium planted in vintage wooden crate

  I love colorful labels and the paper on a can will last longer when sealed;  but sometimes I remove the label and simply  let the can rust.

colorful recycled tomato can planter

 I confess I sometimes buy a  products based on packaging,  if it can be creatively repurposed I want it.

succulents planted in colorful re-purposed olive oil tin

But sometimes a repurposable package is just a lucky extra.

bourbon box recycled into fun and unexplexted planter


Creative gathering: how to make paper

how to make paper

Hallelujah! Finally, my studio is restored and reclaimed! After months of repair and restoration, that threw my studio into disarray, I have my creative escape back.

 

cabin studio

 

I held a gathering to celebrate and the creative activity was paper-making.

 

how to make paper gathering at blue antler studio

 

Three of my five sisters – kindred spirits all – joined me in the celebration and the creative process of making paper.

 

making paper with kindred spirits in the studio

 

Having made paper with my small children, who are now ages 23-30 (admittedly a while ago),  I knew it was a simple, fun process. But I Googled “how to make paper” just to refresh my memory; it returned intimidating results with complicated, multi-step instructions. So I decided to turn off the computer and go with what I remembered about the process. After gathering supplies and putting on our creativity rings (a tradition among my sisters) we got started.

Supplies

Recyclable paper – torn or shredded (we had newspaper, junk mail, old magazines and paper bags).

Extra newspaper (blotting paper) and old towels – for blotting out water

An electric blender

Rolling pen

Chalk powder or crushed chalk pieces – for color

Flowers, leaves etc.

Water

Large container for water bath

A frame/screen sieve: This is a simple tool similar to what gold miners would use to pan for gold (the frame can be different sizes but need to be a few inches deep with the top side open and the bottom side covered with a taut, fine screen or sheer fabric) and must fit into the water bath container.

Hubby made a frame/screen sieve for each of us out of scrap 2×2 lumber and an old, torn window screen. For each sieve he cut the 2×2 lumber into two – 9 inch long pieces and two – 12 inch pieces (the size can be whatever you want and determines the size of the finished paper, but it must fit into the container used for the water bath).

Using glue, screws and the cut lumber pieces he constructed a simple, rectangular frame.

Then using the assembled frame as a pattern, he cut two pieces of screen, one slightly larger than the frame (which he stapled tautly across the bottom of the frame to create the sieve), the second piece of screen he cut to the size of the inner dimensions of the frame; on this piece he left 4×4 inch tabs on each end of the screen. The screen with the tabs fit snugly inside the frame/sieve with the tabs sticking up above the edge of the frame so we could use them to gently lift the paper out of the frame. (By using the extra screen with tabs to remove the newly made paper from the frame/sieve to dry, it allows you to make more paper with one frame more quickly: this step can be skipped and the newly made paper can be left in the frame/sieve to dry)

optional – creativity ring :)

 

making paper in our creativity rings

 

Step 1: shred recycle paper in blender adding enough water to make a thick soupy pulp (at this time you can add chalk for color, flowers or glitter etc.)

 

paper making using a kitchen blender

Step 2: fill water bath container with water

Step 3: place screen with tab inside the frame/screen sieve (make sure tabs are sticking up and out of the frame); place the frame/sieve into the water bath barely  submerging the screen; pour blended paper pulp into the frame/screen sieve until the screen is completely covered with a thin layer of pulp; gently swirl the frame in the water to evenly spread the pulp over the screen; at this point you can place pressed objects into the pulp, make sure there is some pulp overlapping the object.

water bath stage of making paper

 

beautifully embellished hand made paper

 

Step 4: lift the frame from the water bath, let drain and place on towel or layer of blotting paper and blot gently.

 

making paper using recycled newspaper

 

Step 5: using tabs on the screen gently lift the paper from the frame and place the screen with the new paper onto hard surface covered with a layer of blotting paper and cover with more blotting paper, gently roll with rolling pen (using no pressure) to express more water, then carefully peel off the blotting paper.

Step 6: carefully transfer the new paper to a drying rack with the newly made paper down and carefully peel away the screen with tabs.

papermaking, releasing from screen (2).JPG 2

 

We used another old screen as a drying rack.

 

making paper embellished with flowers and drying in the sun

It was a wonderful, creative gathering.

 

making paper gathering in the studio

And another moment for my collection.

Check out  the following link for more great sites full of inspiration

2013-Shab-Friday-logo3


The 4th of July from a Brooklyn roof top

The 4th of July from a Brooklyn roof top:

the 4th from a rooftop in brooklyn

 

This 4th of July I spent a week  in Brooklyn with my daughter (a soon to be mother) and her husband.  We  spent the first few days of my stay  making their lovely  apartment ready for the arrival of their baby boy.

 

The 4th from a Brooklyn roof top

 

Phase one of our efforts was to move the bed into the living room – loft style.  The apartment would be a true loft, with open living, dining and kitchen space, twelve-foot ceilings, wall of windows, and reclaimed wood floors except for the odd partition added to boost it into the one bedroom rental bracket.  We then divided the partitioned space with part of it being designated closet/dressing area and the rest set up for the baby.

 

The 4th from a Brooklyn roof top

4th from a brookly rooftop

 

Then we moved on to  completing the  little odds and end jobs that tend to get put off until such an occasion as a nesting  mother-to-be: hanging mirrors and pictures, re-potting plants, cleaning baseboard  and organizing storage.

 

The 4th from a Brooklyn roof top

4th from a brooklyn rooftop

the 4th from a brooklyn rooftop

 

Little Rocco pup knows something’s up.

 

4th from a brooklyn rooftop

DSCN1879

 

But not to worry, we  made room on our to-do list for  dining at amazing restaurants, shopping in Manhattan and visiting the Brooklyn flea, where I purchased this fabulous bag by Ryan Greer of flux productions, www.fluxproductions.net

 

the 4th from a brooklyn rooftop

 

and of course, fireworks over Manhattan – the 4th from a Brooklyn roof-top.

 

the 4th from a brooklyn rooftop

the 4th from a brooklyn rooftop

 

 

4th from a brookly rooftop

I’ve joined the party over at

2013-Shab-Friday-logo3


replanting my perennial garden

Replanting my perennial garden.

dragonfly

If I could have  ordered up a perfect spring it would have looked and felt a lot like this one.  Actually, I can’t remember  a more perfect  spring season.  We have had cool to moderate temps, plenty of rain yet  enough dry time for  planting – which makes for very happy gardens.  It has been ideal for replanting my perennial garden starting with the flower  bed between the cabin and my studio, which had been pretty much  destroyed by deer and the recent repairs and remodeling and work on the courtyard. But now it is the  home to happy salvia, English lavender, penstemon ‘ red riding hood’, pink abelia, lantana, delphinium and coreopsis.

replanting my perennial garden

 

Deck with twisted vine rail and garvel courtyard

Gravel path between cabins

After stocking up on annuls at several  local green houses I  repurposed found objects like old wood crates, tin cans, gourds, a decaying bird house and even a rotting log into  planters for my porch.

Spring planters for the cabin porch

tomato can planter

gourd and birdhouse planters

Soon to come during this near-perfect spring –  a  new blackberry patch and tomato and pepper garden.

I love springtime!

For more inspiration heck out the party over  at the following links

vintage inspiration bif

http://www.dwellings-theheartofyourhome.com/

livelaughlinky-250x250

 


Peppers In The Garden

Jeff in his garden

Last year my brother’s garden had a bumper crop of peppers and he generously shared his harvest.  My kids and I took advantage of his generosity put up (canned)  some pretty awesome hot sauce. The hot sauce was such a hit that this year, along with my tomatoes, I  put out an impressive selection of  peppers.

 

peppers in the garden

Hubby constructed a tall fence around my small plot to keep deer out of my tomatoes and peppers.

Inspired by the technique over at  The Farm, Old World Garden and assisted by hubby and my sister, Edna, we created raised rows  covered with straw and mulched the  paths.

kathy in the garden

 

wayne mulching the garden

 

 

Edna in the garden

 

I also planted some bird house gourds along the back of the deer fence, we’ll see if they behave or if they try to take over the entire garden – my experience with rambunctious gourds leaves little hope they will behave, even so I can’t help but love them.  I also planted some extra gourds around the vintage hay rake near the garden shed.

 

gourds around the rake

 


Old Chair, New Look

Aren’t these lovely? One old chair, gets a new look with paint and vintage table clothe.

Old chairs to refurbish

I have to start by confessing that I am not an expert on upholstery, in fact I’ve never upholstered anything before.  I have made slip covers but never have I stripped naked a piece of furniture and re-clothed it in a new look – but there’s a first time for everything. So I started carefully  pulling off fabric.

striping down old chair to refurbish

I found old cotton/horse hair/straw stuffing, burlap, metal  upholstery grip-strips (my terminology, probably not the correct term) and springs inside of my old chair .

Inside of old chair to be refurbish

Stripping off the old was easy, deciding what the new would be was more difficult.

lovely collection of fabric

I’m kind’a vibing pom-poms.

lov'n pom-poms

Finally I decided on using a vintage tablecloth (a cutter one), a soft warm white paint and pom-poms.

old chair new look with paint and vintage tablecloth

Old chair, new look

Check out this blog for more creativity

2013-Shab-Friday-logo3

 


Lovely Quilt Cube Side Table

Lovely Quilt Cube Side Table:

Basic box store foam cube up-scaled into this lovely, rolling,  quilt-cube side table.

quilt cube

Another empty-nest leftover transformed from this-

quilt cube foam blockquilt cube rolling base

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

to this-

quilt cube in room

Scraps of vintage textiles camouflage tears and blemishes in the cutter quilt slip-cover

quilt cube detail

while pieces of salvaged wooden planks with lovely distressed paint make the base.

quilt cube on wheels

Simple wheels finished the project.

 

 for more inspiration visit…

1-Funky_Junks_Party_Junk_link_party.29-AM

vintage inspiration bif


Glamping – It’s a Girl Thing

Glamping – it’s a girl thing and it is coming to the ridge!  I’m hosting  a clamping weekend this fall for  my sisters and the planning is already underway. There will be  activities like bread baking, hiking, crafting, outdoor chick-flicks (Mama Mia, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, How to Make an American Quilt- suggestions welcomed) a vineyard picnic, or maybe a trip to the orchard,  campfires and of course glamping up our tents. This weekend sister Edna (my sister not a” Sister sister”) came by to help me on a trial tent glamp-up.

glamping

While it’s a must that our glamping accommodations be fabulous, here on the ridge we glamp on the cheap.  To that end,  our yard sale treasures this spring have been heavy on the glamping theme with lovely textiles, accessories and furnishings suitable for making  our tents, which will be pop-ups and picnic tents, fabulously  glamorous. With sister Enda’s pop-up tent and the yard sale’n inventory of lovely stuff, we put together a space that is the essence of glamor + camping.

glamping set-up

Sis arrived with her pop-up tent and a vision of  a filmy, white, shabby chic space; which I love, however I was feeling  a bit more color. As it turned out,  her tent was blue and we had only enough white sheers for three walls, so entered my colorful tablecloths and a touch of  bohemian; the marriage of our visions resulted in  a glorious space with a wonderful vibe.

fabulous glamping tent

The day was windy and we often found ourselves engulfed in a flowy mass of white, billowing in the breeze; so we anchored the bottom of the fabric by threading a string through the hems and securing the string under the stakes at each tent pole.

glamping on the ridge

Then we invited the rest of the sisters out for a preview…

glamping sisters (3)

and a few treats.

glamping eats

glamping sisters

I’m LOVE’N it!

I'm glamping

 check out

Glamping by MaryJane

 I’ve join the following linky party

 

P1040470-2

http://ivyandelephants.blogspot.com/2013/05/happy-blogiversary.html

 


Spring Time: Lilac, Peonies, Redbuds and Yard Sales

Spring time: lilac, peonies, red-buds and yard sales.

yard sale finds, vintage candle holders and textile

Yard sale finds, vintage candle holders and textile

 

Spring time is one of my favorite seasons, OK it’s one of my   four faves, I can’t help it, there is something wonderful about each season.  But spring is about new beginnings and here on the Ridge it  is  perfumed with  lilacs and peonies; adorned  in a virgin green and flushing in the  bloom of red-bud trees. It  also heralds in a favorite  weekend activity –  the yard sale – have I mentioned my people are yard sale’rs. My dad often laments, “Yard sale’n is a disease and I guess I’ve given it to all my children.” But pull open any drawer in my  mom’s house and you’ll  find evidence of her  contribution to our yard-sale’n disorder, particularly when it comes to textiles.

This year my yard sale’n kicked off with  an estate sale.  At  seven forty five, on a very chilly Saturday morning,  my dad, my  sister and I were standing  in line outside of a three story, early 1900’s house . It was a liquidation of an estate of a grandmother; most of the nine children and several of the grandchildren were working the sale. The crowd was heavy with seasoned pickers and the competition  for the good stuff was stiff. Fortunately for me,  I am usually not in the market for the “good stuff”: I am, however, in the market for sweet, lovely stuff.  And on this day, among the crowd of elbows I managed to find some truly sweet,  lovely “stuff”.

yard sale find, vintage clothesline

 

yard sale find, vintage kitchen scale

Yard sale find, vintage kitchen scale

 

yard sale finds

Collection of yard sale finds

 

yard sale finds, collection of candle sticks

Yard sale finds, collection of candle sticks

 

 vintage inspiration bif


Vintage Vibe For Box Store Shelving

Vintage vibe for box store shelving

. Vintage vibe for box store shelving

As an empty-nester I can verify that when  the chicks leave the nest they leave it far from empty. Each time one of our little darlings set out on their own, Hubby and I found ourselves the keeper stuff – unwanted, but wanted stuff; treasures of childhood, mementos of college days and  a menagerie of mismatched  furniture  usually in rough shape.  These shelves fall into the last category.

box store shelf update before

But after a little creative restyling they look like this…

box store shelf update finished

In fact they turned out so beautiful they were snatched up on the first day of my fall sale.

DIY:

Although the shelves were in good shape, they looked exactly like what they were, box store shelves. So I took sand paper to them and roughed them up enough so paint would  adhere. I then gave them a coat of a warm white paint and  sanded them again, taking off some of the white paint (more of the paint came off than I had intended or usually want, but this time it looked right so I went with it). Next step was to mellow the paint and any fresh wood exposed from sanding by coating the entire shelf with a dark stain (applied with a brush then quickly wiped off with a rag). Once it was completely dry I coated the shelves with a flat, clear sealer.

Meanwhile I took some vintage wallpaper I have been holding onto, cut it into strips as  wide as the inside depth of the shelves and  as long as the shelves were wide plus  and extra foot or so. With a  spray adhesive I covered the bake of the paper with fabric (I used remnants of old sheets) and trimmed the fabric to the size of the paper. This gave strength to the otherwise delicate paper.  I carefully wove the lined paper over and under the slates of the shelving. To finish I trimmed off the excess paper and secured the edges to the underside of the framing with furniture tacks.

This project turned out so beautiful,, I might have to make another with the remaining shelves in our keepers stash.

 


A Hearty Basic Bread Recipe

Hearty basic bread:

DSCN0879

As I mentioned in a recent post, I have been making  this great basic bread based on  a  recipe posted by Diana Bauman, over at the Humble Kitchen blog,  http://www.myhumblekitchen.com/2013/03/simple-european-style-everyday-bread-recipe-with-video/#more-4764.   For the past few days  my son and I  have been experimenting and tweaking the recipe to make an equally simple, but little more hearty, basic bread.  The whole process has been great fun and now I’m ready to share our modified recipe.  It is soooo good and soooo simple you’ll want to throw on an apron and get started.  Let me know how you like this hearty basic bread.

Original “Simple European Style Everyday Bread”

Ingredients:

2 1/2 cups flour (you’ll add more as you knead)
2 tsp salt
2 1/2 tsp yeast
1 1/4 cup warm water
extra virgin olive oil

Diana has posted a really helpful video on “Humble Kitchen” where she demonstrates the entire process, I would definitely recommend you give it a view.

 

My Modified, ” Hearty Basic Bread Recipe”
2 cups flour-unbleached all purpose
1/4  cup almond flour
1/4 cup milled flax seed
1 cup sunflower seeds (next time I think I’ll try pumpkin seeds)
2 tsp salt
2 1/2 tsp yeast
1 1/4 cup warm water
EVOO (extra virgin olive oil)

The method is exactly the same for both the recipes.

Mix well together the all purpose  flour, almond flour, milled flaxseed, pumpkin seeds, salt and yeast in a large bowl.
Stir in warm water until dough is sticky and shaggy.

shaggy dough

shaggy dough

With floured hands knead the dough right in the bowl for 3 or 4 minutes – you will need to dust  the dough with flour  occasionally (no more than an  extra 3 tablespoons) so you can continue to handle it, but you want the dough to stay light and tacky.
Once the dough is holding together and is  firm and  tacky,  pour about a teaspoon of evoo over the dough

adding EVOO to dough

adding EVOO to dough

Then  using oiled hands gently but firmly knead the dough into a tight ball – this is done by placing your  hands a few inches apart on the top of the ball of dough, gently but firmly force the dough from the top of the ball out, over the side, down and under to the bottom while maintaining the shape – apply enough pressure to keep the ball together and to meld the dough back together on the underside of the ball; repeat this for 2-3 minutes until you have formed a tight ball.

kneading dough

kneading dough

kneading dough

kneading dough
Place the dough into a well  oiled bowl, roll the dough in the oil then cover the bowl  with plastic wrap and  a cloth towel, let  rise for one  hour.

cover with towel

cover with towel

place dough in well oiled dough

place dough in well oiled dough

 

cover with plastic wrap

cover with plastic wrap

After the hour  the dough should have doubled in size, carefully remove it from the bowl to  a floured surface – don’t compress or punch down the dough, although it will fall.

remove dough from bowl

remove dough from bowl

Now repeat the kneading process from  he previous step until it is once more a tight ball
Place the ball of dough on a cookie sheet,  gently  cut a large X about half an  inch deep across the top of the ball (you will need a razor or very sharp knife).

I use scissors to cut x on top of dough

I use scissors to cut x on top of dough

Rub or brush a bit  more evoo over the top and sprinkle lightly with four
Once again cover the dough with plastic wrap and a towel and let rise for another 20 minutes.

cover dough with plastic wrap and towel

cover dough with plastic wrap and towel

Now pre-heat oven to 500F
After the 20 minutes place it in the  preheated oven  and bake for 10 minutes at 500F- then lower the temperature to 350F and bake for  another 25  minutes

place dough in pre-heated oven

place dough in pre-heated oven

After baking let the bread sit and cool to room temperature  – if you can :)

If you have more self-control than I do, share a photo of your fresh-baked bread.

yummy

yummy


Back to Basics by Baking Basic Bread

Back to basics by baking basic bread:

I hope you had a wonderful Easter, we certainly did.  Hubby and I celebrated the day of hope and promise  with our son, who is visiting for a short time before  heading off on yet  another adventure somewhere in the world.  We watched the sunrise over the ocean then later dined outside to the sound of the waves and  cooled by  a light ocean breeze.  We spent the day together as we prepared our meal as a team, hubby on the grill, me at the oven and my sweet boy  preparing the alfresco dinning area.

For some time I have been thinking about doing some bread baking, I use to enjoy baking  bread but years of  anti-carb rhetoric had taken away some of the joy; even though  bread baking is perhaps one of the oldest  life-sustaining traditions the world over.  Then a few days ago I was  visiting a favorite blog and came across a bread recipe that resonated with me. Diana Bauman over at Humble Kitchen (you can find the link on my home page under kindred spirits) shared a recipe she described as “Simple European Style Everyday Bread” –  with a title like that, who  could  resist! So for Easter dinner I prepared this beautiful, and beautifully simple, bread for my family. Inspired by the tradition and simplicity of the bread I also decided to make some home-made butter; another super simple process.

Later we gave thanks and shared our Easter  meal together on the porch and dined on steak grilled on Himalayan salt blocks, asparagus casserole, baked potatoes, warm-from-the-oven home-baked bread and freshly churned (blended) creamy white butter – yum!

Home made butter and home baked bread

Get back to basics by baking basic bread.

Making butter in my Ninja blender: Pour a pint of heavy whipping cream and a pinch of salt into a blender or food processor (I used a ninja blender) Blend until a solid clump forms and separates from the liquid (butter milk). I stopped the blending several time to push the whipped cream down into the blades; this process took several minutes.  Strain the clump through cheese cloth, shape (I used a small bowl to shape my butter into a mound but it can also be shaped into a log and gently wrapped in wax paper.  Keep  refrigerated.

 “Simple European Style Everyday Bread”

http://www.myhumblekitchen.com/2013/03/simple-european-style-everyday-bread-recipe-with-video/#more-4764    –

 

 

 


Seaside Style

beach house

I  have been lucky enough to spend part of my life in or near the salt spray of the sea.  In many ways that part of my life is very different from my cabin on the ridge where history, tradition and rural living amid deep, shady forests and steep meadows of black-eyed Susie’s, Queen Ann’s lace and milkweed  continue to influence me and my style.   Now however, sand, salt and an amazing range of blue and aqua demand a place in my heart and my seaside style.

Beach house

Mornings begin with a kaleidoscopic of sunrise colors.

Sunrise over the ocean from beach house patio

 

Sunrise from beach house bar

Sunrise over the ocean from beach house porch

 

The moods of the sea are many and vivid…

Storm over the ocean

 

Lightening over the oceanSunrise over the ocean

and influence my seaside style –

Beach house

Mosaic table

   Inside ….

Seaside style, beach house

 

Beach house bar mosaic

beach house

Beach house

Beach house mosaic flamingo

Beach house

 

Beach house

Beach house

Beach house

lamp love

Beach house

2nd double bedroom

 

Beach house

 

and outside.

Beach house bar

 

 

Beach houseBeach house

Beach house

 

Beach house

Beach house

 

Beach house

Beach house

 

 

But the most important element of my style, seaside or on the ridge, is easy comfort; so friends and family feel welcomed and relaxed enough to kick off the flip-flops or gum boots and put their feet up.

Beach house

 

 

 

 


Lamp Love

vintage hankies repurposed into a lamp shape

Lamp love –

Lighting can create the mood but lamps can create the style!


Art Exhibit, NSB, FL

art exhibit at the nest new smyrna beach florida

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My art exhibit at the Nest was wonderfully exciting with a great turnout by the community.  There was lively entertainment, interesting wines and, of course, art to enjoy and purchase ( several paintings were sold).  I want to thank my friends and supporters for participating in the evening, I couldn’t have done it without you and I sincerely hope you had as much fun as did I.

Art exhibit at Nest NSB

 

 

 

 

 

 

Art exhibit Nest,NSB 2-15-13

 

 

 

 

 

 

Art exhibit at Nest NSB

 

 

 

 

 

 


%d bloggers like this: