Life on the creative side

Posts tagged “cabin

replanting my perennial garden

Replanting my perennial garden.

dragonfly

If I could have  ordered up a perfect spring it would have looked and felt a lot like this one.  Actually, I can’t remember  a more perfect  spring season.  We have had cool to moderate temps, plenty of rain yet  enough dry time for  planting – which makes for very happy gardens.  It has been ideal for replanting my perennial garden starting with the flower  bed between the cabin and my studio, which had been pretty much  destroyed by deer and the recent repairs and remodeling and work on the courtyard. But now it is the  home to happy salvia, English lavender, penstemon ‘ red riding hood’, pink abelia, lantana, delphinium and coreopsis.

replanting my perennial garden

 

Deck with twisted vine rail and garvel courtyard

Gravel path between cabins

After stocking up on annuls at several  local green houses I  repurposed found objects like old wood crates, tin cans, gourds, a decaying bird house and even a rotting log into  planters for my porch.

Spring planters for the cabin porch

tomato can planter

gourd and birdhouse planters

Soon to come during this near-perfect spring –  a  new blackberry patch and tomato and pepper garden.

I love springtime!

For more inspiration heck out the party over  at the following links

vintage inspiration bif

http://www.dwellings-theheartofyourhome.com/

livelaughlinky-250x250

 


A Lovely Gravel Patio

gravel patio

Ok friends here’s another project update…

But first a little background:
butterflies in the gardenA few years ago the beautiful garden between Blue Antler Studio and the cabin was in decline.  It started with the lovely elm tree which was unfortunately lost to the blight that swept through our area. Then after a late hard freeze, many of our pollinators suffered; dropping the number of butterflies frequenting the garden from dozens at a time to a handful ; and of course the native honeybee had already been struggling for several years. Then we opened up the kitchen wall and built the new deck which encroached further into the weakened garden. We soon realized it would make more sense to move the garden altogether and utilize the space between the two structures as an outdoor living area.

We got started by digging up the remaining plants in the garden.

transplanting flowers from my garden

We replanted them along the path that would lead to the new patio.

path to the patio

Then we graded off the area, taking it down to the same elevation of the studio before adding several inches of gravel.

grading ground for patio

After compacting the gravel we added a low retaining wall around the upper side of the patio, curving it to create a cozy circular seating area.

curve of patio wall

The next step was to build the fire pit in front of the seating area. With the help of my, can-do-it-all, brother and my, I’m stronger-than-I-look, daughter we took an old metal fire ring and some incredible rocks (remnants of an old barn foundation that once stood on my childhood farm) and we created this amazing fire pit.

my amazing fire pit builders

looking down on my patio and fire pit

first fire in fire pit

For the final touch, my sisters helped me gather up interesting containers to repurpose  into unique patio planters; filled with Joe pye, sedum, mums, geraniums, saliva, sweet potatoes and other various vines they now grace my new outdoor space.  (Useful tip – first we partially filled the containers with empty plastic bottles, caps on, to help fill the voluminous space).

A leaky metal garbage can, filled with blooms, adds interest to the studio entrance.

re-purposed garbage can as planter

An overflowing, rusty-red wheelbarrow adds balance flanking the other side of the door.

rusty red wheelbarrow planter

Old metal tubs and buckets and…

sedum and succulents planted in old metal tubs

some broken wooden crates scattered  around the patio, provide pops of whimsy and color.

geranium planted in old wooden crate

Finally, the result of all our efforts  is this lovely patio!

my new patio

my gravel patio

Stay tuned for phase two – it will involve a rustic arbor and this beautiful, live-cut, pine-slab for alfresco dinning.

live edge pine slab for patio table Hubby sure needs his workshop finished!


A Cabin Kitchen Remodel

country french inspired kitchen island remodel with antique rain gutter wine rack

We are finally finishing up or winding down our summer projects at the cabin and studio.  Actually my studio has been commandeered for storage and work space until hubby’s workshop/barn is completed. Fortunately not having my studio hasn’t been too much of an issue, as I’ve been so busy with house and yard projects over the last few months that I haven’t needed it; come fall however, it will be a different story. But now, as promised, is one of the projects that we have completed.

My kitchen started out last summer like this.

punched tin pine cabinet

Now, as it should be, it is my favorite room in the cabin.

Cabin kitchen remodel

Our first step was painting the bead-board ceiling a creamy white to help light reflect around the room. We then rearranged the appliances and added some old heart-pine cabinets that hubby had made almost thirty years ago for another house.  Because the cabinets were not designed for this space, we created open shelving, with painted bead-board backing (a wonderful green), to fill in the empty spaces. I loaded the shelves with lovely things – all mice proof of course, as this is an old cabin in the country.

Open shelving in farm kitchen

I love that all the textiles in the space are mismatched; my sister donated light airy curtains for the windows; vintage embroidered pillowcases cover the chair cushions; instead of doors under the counter we used French inspired table clothes as curtains; different patterned tablecloths also flank the sliding door which leads out to the new deck with twisted vine rails, which leads to the new patio…but all that will be in another post.

 

Cabin kitchen remodel with tablecloths as curtains

 Light airy curtains and landscape painting by kathry t lundberg, lighten a kitchen

The counter top and back-splash is walnut from an old tree that fell on the home place years ago and has been stored in my sister’s barn; Hubby roughed up the surface and rounded the edges to give it an aged look, then sealed it with food safe oil.  The sink was in the structure when we found it and was moved along with the logs to the current location. A few years ago hubby built the sink cabinet and I painted and finished it to look like an old piece of furniture (what a team we make)

cabin kitchen sink

The island was constructed from the very first piece of woodworking hubby made for the cabin, all those years ago; a pine cabinet with punched tin doors perched high on tall legs.  We removed the legs; painted and distressed the whole thing; added reclaimed porch posts and a couple of salvaged angle brackets from an old farm-house to support the new shelving and bar height counter. Finally we topped it off with a beautiful piece of marble given to us by a friend.  I finished the bar shelf with a primitive painting of the houses along the ridge. Hubby even put power in the island so at this Christmas’s tree trimming party I won’t be crowded in the corner with my back to the revelers while preparing the grilled cheese sandwiches.

french inspired kitchen island

distressed French blue kitchen cabinet doors

recycled porch posts for kitchen island

primitive folk art painting on kitchen counter by kathryn t lundberg

folk art painting on kitchen island counter

The lighting is the final project; I’m just waiting for the perfect fixture to find its way to me.

Country French inspired Cabin kitchen remodel with antique rain gutter wine rack

 vintage farmhouse

 


Summer Projects Around the Cabin and Studio

pine cabinet before being repurposed

As I write this post I’m sitting on my cabin porch on rocky round.  The summer has been hot and volatile but this morning the air is cool and fresh.  For the past month hubby and I have been supper busy around the studio and cabin. We have been finishing up the kitchen remodel, creating a gravel patio, renovating the guest loft, revamping the garden beds and most ambitiously building a workshop/barn for my hubby.

I’m posting a few pics of the ongoing projects, but I will post more details of the projects as they are completed.

We are refurbishing and re-purposing this old pine cabinet hubby made 25 years ago.

pine cabinet before being repurposed

It now looks like this…

french inspired kitchen island made from recycled cabinet

I’m loving it!

The space between the studio and the cabin is being transformed into a gathering area; when completed it will house a fire-pit, chairs and a gorgeous, ten foot, live-edge table! Hubby has a lot on his honey-do list.

I even got to drive the bobcat-too much fun!

bob-cat used to grade patio

And hubby is working hard; looking good honey.

digging a trench for plumbing

Notice the rock wall around the garden, I’m learning all sorts of new skills.

gravel paito

And here’s hubby’s new shop/barn.

building a workshop/barn

I will share the finished projects as they are completed.


Living Succulent Wreath

Living succulent wreath:living succulent wreath

While my daughter Kate, of Twice Treasured, was visiting for Mother’s Day, she mentioned a beautiful living succulent wreath project she had recently pinned  on Pinterest.  She commented that sometimes she, like a lot of us, was guilty of pinning projects with the intention of doing them but then not following through.  This project, however, was so perfect for us that we decided to make  time and actually create this beautiful succulent wreath.

Supplies:
Two wire wreath forms
Medium gauge wire and wire cutters
Mat floral moss
Succulent soil
Succulents

Line one of the wire wreath forms with the mat moss

making a succulent wreath

Pack with soil (the moss should keep the soil from passing through the back of the wire

Gently work the roots of the succulents through the wire of the other wire form so that the plants are on the outside and the roots are on the inside

applying plants into succulent wreath

 Place the planted form on top of the soil form and wire them together working the  roots  into the soil

 Using your fingers, gently work more moss into the wire around the plants

constructing a succulent wreath

 Cut four-inch pieces of wire and bend them into  hairpin shapes. Press the hairpins into the wreath among the plants and moss to secure

how to construct succulent wreath

Water thoroughly and keep the wreath flat for a couple of weeks or until the plants have rooted then it can be hung vertically.

 succulent wreath

check out inspiring links over at Yesterday on Tuesday

http://yesterdayontuesday.com/2013/06/project-inspired-19/

 

 


Two Twisted Tales

Yes there has been a very long (and frustrating) delay in my posting; no it’s not that I have been out fulfilling my dream of wandering through the ancient, art filled, cobblestone streets of the Old World, (you can bet I would be blogging that); and no it’s not because I have nothing to say, (those who know me can stop laughing); nor is it that I am just a lazy blogger, (although I do love an occasional lazy do-nothing day); the simple fact is that, as a blogging novice who can remember grooving to  Simon and Garfunkel, I have encountered some technical glitches that have me standing on a metaphoric bridge poised to toss my *>%##* computer into the murky – troubled waters – below!

Thankfully that moment was brief and it was time to turn my creative energy toward the deck railing project I’ve been deck rails made of twisted twigscontemplating. I am very pleased with the results and I’m excited to share it with you now.

I knew I wanted a wild organic look, what I didn’t know was how I would achieve it.  My first decision was to find the materials and for that I looked to my husband and the surrounding environment. My hubby and I hopped onto the quad and headed into the woods where we collected a large bundle of long twisted strands of wild grapevines.

We still needed material for the rail’s structure. For that we dug through the pile of sawmill waste slabs a neighbor brings to my dad to use as fire wood.

We found several, long, live-cut edge pieces we hoped would work perfectly.

creating a twisted twig railing

Then working like a creative team over thirty years in the making, my hubby and I constructed the beautiful, wild, twisting railing I had envisioned.

So with my creativity and perspective restored I was able to re-address the technical problems plaguing my efforts.  While all the issues are not yet resolved, I have at least un-twisted them enough to resume my passion of sharing and encouraging creativity.

(more…)


Blue Anter Studio Renovation

restoring old log house circa 1820s

That’s my man high up there on the scaffolding.

I mentioned in an earlier post that we discovered considerable critter damage in the ceilings of both the cabin and Blue Antler Studio. So, with repair absolutely necessary,  we’ve decided to take advantage of the situation and change things up a bit while we’re at it.  Work on the studio began by tearing down the ceiling; we striped away the paneling,  insulation and critter pooh, to expose the metal roofing.  The first step for the cabin  was to set up scaffolding. It sure didn’t seem so high thirty years ago,  when we were hoisting the logs up and into place.

Just one of the nests we found behind the ceiling, eeckes!

We want to recycle the tongue and grove; but first I’ll get it scraped, cleaned and primed.

The plan is to paint the ceiling and leave the rafters exposed.  Rigid foam board sandwiched between the tin and panelling will provide  insulation.  If you look closely you can see the expanding foam we sprayed into cracks for further insulation.

My hubby nailing up the ceiling while my brother cuts each piece to fit.

 It’s a lucky lady who has a handyman in her life, and I have two!

 Be sure to follow our progress!


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