Life on the creative side

Posts tagged “home decor and styling

Organic/Industrial chandelier

baby henry

While strolling through Brooklyn on a recent visit to see my daughter and my brand new grandbaby, we spotted a fallen limb from a large sycamore tree. It was lodged into the fencing surrounding the base of the tree and part of the sidewalk that had been heaved up by the expanding roots of the tree.  Although my daughter laughed as I pointed to the limb and said “We need that!” she not only worked it loose from the fencing but then carried it on her shoulder for more than ten blocks, back to her apartment.  I just want to note – strolling around with a large branch on your shoulder makes the normally aloof New Yorker  smile and engage in conversation.

found treasure, fallen limb

The branch had such a lovely organic shape and wonderful patina that we both immediately saw its potential for an amazing chandelier over their table, for which they have been in search.

Since hubby was due to arrive the following day we had him throw in some lighting supplies, including five Edison style light bulbs. Then a few days later…

dinning under the light

we were dinning under this beautiful  organic/industrial chandelier.

Finally we added a dimmer switch the chandelier could be adjusted lower for ambiance or raised higher for illumination.  Unfortunately we didn’t get good photos of the process but feel free to post any questions on the process  I would be happy to respond.

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Antique headboard repurposed into a beautiful creativity-board

creativity board made from antique headboard

Antique headboard repurposed into a beautiful creativity-board.

 creativity board detail with business card

While cleaning out her barn my sister found a forgotten old headboard in the loft. She thought I might be able to find a new “repurpose” for it; she knows me well.  I have been wanting a creativity center for the studio; a place to display creative inspiration and project plans. A vague idea had been percolating in my mind; a message board, but on a grand scale. The dusty wooden headboard was the right scale and had a graceful form, perfect for my creativity board.

antique headboard repurposed into a creativity/message board

With the help of hubby the found headboard was redesigned into a useful, lovely focal point in the studio.

hubby cutting out plywood for creativity board

Here’s how we repurposed an antique headboard into a lovely creativity board.

Using the headboard as the  template we cut 1/4 inch plywood into a smaller version of the headboard by trimming four inches off the pattern all the way around.

tracing headboard for template

hubby helping with creativity board 2

I placed a layer of quilt batting over the plywood and held that in place with a layer of burlap which we held in place with staples on the back side of the plywood.

cotton layer of creativity board

burlap layer on creativity board

Next we covered it with a vintage chenille bedspread, again stapled to the back. Staples were also used to attach the cotton string, snuggly but not taut, that we crisscrossed across the front, over the chenille. Where  the strings crossed each other, I stapled the intersection down into the plywood, creating a tuft. Then the plywood was glued to the headboard, which had been painted a soft white.

vintage button on creativity board

We applied construction adhesive to the back of the plywood, carefully centered on the headboard and weighted it down for several hours. To add strength we added screws through the back of the headboard into the plywood (making sure they did not protrude out the front side of the plywood. I finished the project with buttons over the intersections of the string.

jar of vintage buttons

Now the creativity board, hangs in the studio, covered with creative possibilities.

creativity board made from antique headboard

headboard repurposed into creativity board

I & E Button

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show and tell fridays

the shabby nest

craftberry bush link party

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The 4th of July from a Brooklyn roof top

The 4th of July from a Brooklyn roof top:

the 4th from a rooftop in brooklyn

 

This 4th of July I spent a week  in Brooklyn with my daughter (a soon to be mother) and her husband.  We  spent the first few days of my stay  making their lovely  apartment ready for the arrival of their baby boy.

 

The 4th from a Brooklyn roof top

 

Phase one of our efforts was to move the bed into the living room – loft style.  The apartment would be a true loft, with open living, dining and kitchen space, twelve-foot ceilings, wall of windows, and reclaimed wood floors except for the odd partition added to boost it into the one bedroom rental bracket.  We then divided the partitioned space with part of it being designated closet/dressing area and the rest set up for the baby.

 

The 4th from a Brooklyn roof top

4th from a brookly rooftop

 

Then we moved on to  completing the  little odds and end jobs that tend to get put off until such an occasion as a nesting  mother-to-be: hanging mirrors and pictures, re-potting plants, cleaning baseboard  and organizing storage.

 

The 4th from a Brooklyn roof top

4th from a brooklyn rooftop

the 4th from a brooklyn rooftop

 

Little Rocco pup knows something’s up.

 

4th from a brooklyn rooftop

DSCN1879

 

But not to worry, we  made room on our to-do list for  dining at amazing restaurants, shopping in Manhattan and visiting the Brooklyn flea, where I purchased this fabulous bag by Ryan Greer of flux productions, www.fluxproductions.net

 

the 4th from a brooklyn rooftop

 

and of course, fireworks over Manhattan – the 4th from a Brooklyn roof-top.

 

the 4th from a brooklyn rooftop

the 4th from a brooklyn rooftop

 

 

4th from a brookly rooftop

I’ve joined the party over at

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Old Chair, New Look

Aren’t these lovely? One old chair, gets a new look with paint and vintage table clothe.

Old chairs to refurbish

I have to start by confessing that I am not an expert on upholstery, in fact I’ve never upholstered anything before.  I have made slip covers but never have I stripped naked a piece of furniture and re-clothed it in a new look – but there’s a first time for everything. So I started carefully  pulling off fabric.

striping down old chair to refurbish

I found old cotton/horse hair/straw stuffing, burlap, metal  upholstery grip-strips (my terminology, probably not the correct term) and springs inside of my old chair .

Inside of old chair to be refurbish

Stripping off the old was easy, deciding what the new would be was more difficult.

lovely collection of fabric

I’m kind’a vibing pom-poms.

lov'n pom-poms

Finally I decided on using a vintage tablecloth (a cutter one), a soft warm white paint and pom-poms.

old chair new look with paint and vintage tablecloth

Old chair, new look

Check out this blog for more creativity

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Lamp Love

vintage hankies repurposed into a lamp shape

Lamp love –

Lighting can create the mood but lamps can create the style!


Kathryn T Lundberg Painting Exhibition at The Nest, NSB

Painting exhibition, Art and Wine at The Nest, NSB, FL

Painting, Storm coming over Florida wet land, acrylic on canavas

I have exciting news for all my friends and lovers of art, wine and beer; there is a painting exhibition featuring my work in the sweet little beach  town of New Smyrna Beach, FL. My paintings will be exhibited February 15 at the Nest.  http://www.facebook.com/NestNSB?fref=ts . The show opening will coincide with a wine tasting event hosted by the Nest.

The Nest is a wonderful boutique housed in a compound of historic buildings and featuring an eclectic mix of unique new, vintage, collectible and hand crafted home furnishings and décor – and (this is the really fun part) – a lovely collection of wines by the glass and select micro brews. You can sip your wine or beer sitting at the bar nestled in the interior of the shop or take your drink outside to the beautiful courtyard, featuring impressive water and fire features.

I am excited and I’m looking forward to the event.  It should be lots of fun; wine tasting, live entertainment, light hors d’oeuvres and (tooting my own horn here) some beautiful paintings; all in a lovely garden setting.

 

 


Beautiful Vignettes

window vingette

Beautiful vignettes may be defined as small and pleasing but they have a huge impact on the pleasantness of a space. Vignettes accessorize my favorite spaces, indoors and out.

Vignettes brighten my rooms

fabric vignette

Texture, pattern and form create beautiful vignettes in everyday places…

 

vignette on kitch shelf

and creative choices for storage creates a lovely vignette in my kitchen.

 

fish vignette

Carefully arranged collections create a lovely vignette, like this school of fish over my TV cabinet…

 

vignette with baskets

and a collection of my dads handcrafted hickory baskets fill that awkward space above the fridge.

 

mantle vignette

An eclectic mix of vintage mirrors and seaside finds grace the mantle of our beach-side cottage.

 

vignette with painting

One of my paintings acts a backdrop to a seaside inspired vignette.

 

vignette with produce

Fresh produce and flowers from the garden create beautiful vignettes for the table.

 

Beautiful vignettes grace my windows, enhancing views both in and out.

window vingette

lovely looking out…

 

window vingette

and lovely looking in.

 Vignettes grace my gardens

garden vignettes

I love little unexpected touches in the garden.

 

garden vignette

Like the painting I used as a backdrop inside, one of my mosaics, tucked behind a collection of pots and plants outside, create an unexpected vignette in the garden.

So look around your home for opportunities to create beautiful vignettes and enhance the pleasantness to your own space.


A Cabin Kitchen Remodel

country french inspired kitchen island remodel with antique rain gutter wine rack

We are finally finishing up or winding down our summer projects at the cabin and studio.  Actually my studio has been commandeered for storage and work space until hubby’s workshop/barn is completed. Fortunately not having my studio hasn’t been too much of an issue, as I’ve been so busy with house and yard projects over the last few months that I haven’t needed it; come fall however, it will be a different story. But now, as promised, is one of the projects that we have completed.

My kitchen started out last summer like this.

punched tin pine cabinet

Now, as it should be, it is my favorite room in the cabin.

Cabin kitchen remodel

Our first step was painting the bead-board ceiling a creamy white to help light reflect around the room. We then rearranged the appliances and added some old heart-pine cabinets that hubby had made almost thirty years ago for another house.  Because the cabinets were not designed for this space, we created open shelving, with painted bead-board backing (a wonderful green), to fill in the empty spaces. I loaded the shelves with lovely things – all mice proof of course, as this is an old cabin in the country.

Open shelving in farm kitchen

I love that all the textiles in the space are mismatched; my sister donated light airy curtains for the windows; vintage embroidered pillowcases cover the chair cushions; instead of doors under the counter we used French inspired table clothes as curtains; different patterned tablecloths also flank the sliding door which leads out to the new deck with twisted vine rails, which leads to the new patio…but all that will be in another post.

 

Cabin kitchen remodel with tablecloths as curtains

 Light airy curtains and landscape painting by kathry t lundberg, lighten a kitchen

The counter top and back-splash is walnut from an old tree that fell on the home place years ago and has been stored in my sister’s barn; Hubby roughed up the surface and rounded the edges to give it an aged look, then sealed it with food safe oil.  The sink was in the structure when we found it and was moved along with the logs to the current location. A few years ago hubby built the sink cabinet and I painted and finished it to look like an old piece of furniture (what a team we make)

cabin kitchen sink

The island was constructed from the very first piece of woodworking hubby made for the cabin, all those years ago; a pine cabinet with punched tin doors perched high on tall legs.  We removed the legs; painted and distressed the whole thing; added reclaimed porch posts and a couple of salvaged angle brackets from an old farm-house to support the new shelving and bar height counter. Finally we topped it off with a beautiful piece of marble given to us by a friend.  I finished the bar shelf with a primitive painting of the houses along the ridge. Hubby even put power in the island so at this Christmas’s tree trimming party I won’t be crowded in the corner with my back to the revelers while preparing the grilled cheese sandwiches.

french inspired kitchen island

distressed French blue kitchen cabinet doors

recycled porch posts for kitchen island

primitive folk art painting on kitchen counter by kathryn t lundberg

folk art painting on kitchen island counter

The lighting is the final project; I’m just waiting for the perfect fixture to find its way to me.

Country French inspired Cabin kitchen remodel with antique rain gutter wine rack

 vintage farmhouse

 


Living Succulent Wreath

Living succulent wreath:living succulent wreath

While my daughter Kate, of Twice Treasured, was visiting for Mother’s Day, she mentioned a beautiful living succulent wreath project she had recently pinned  on Pinterest.  She commented that sometimes she, like a lot of us, was guilty of pinning projects with the intention of doing them but then not following through.  This project, however, was so perfect for us that we decided to make  time and actually create this beautiful succulent wreath.

Supplies:
Two wire wreath forms
Medium gauge wire and wire cutters
Mat floral moss
Succulent soil
Succulents

Line one of the wire wreath forms with the mat moss

making a succulent wreath

Pack with soil (the moss should keep the soil from passing through the back of the wire

Gently work the roots of the succulents through the wire of the other wire form so that the plants are on the outside and the roots are on the inside

applying plants into succulent wreath

 Place the planted form on top of the soil form and wire them together working the  roots  into the soil

 Using your fingers, gently work more moss into the wire around the plants

constructing a succulent wreath

 Cut four-inch pieces of wire and bend them into  hairpin shapes. Press the hairpins into the wreath among the plants and moss to secure

how to construct succulent wreath

Water thoroughly and keep the wreath flat for a couple of weeks or until the plants have rooted then it can be hung vertically.

 succulent wreath

check out inspiring links over at Yesterday on Tuesday

http://yesterdayontuesday.com/2013/06/project-inspired-19/

 

 


Architectural Salvage

My hubby and I recently attended a lovely, out-of-town wedding.  Since we were there for the weekend we had some time to spend with each other; and hubby surprised me with the perfect outing – a trip to an architectural salvage yard. It was a wonderful surprise and we had a great time: I even found a few treasures (imagine that).

archictectural salvage yard

After spending the morning digging through pieces and remnants of the past, we drove to the wedding with treasures poking out of the trunk, tied down with twine, and filling the back seat of my car.  We got a few stares, laughs and Beverly Hillbilly comments, but of course no one who knew us was surprised.

rusty metal candle sconce for garden accent

A rusty metal candle sconce. I think this will work great in my garden.

large paper dispenser

 I’ve needed a large paper roll dispenser at the studio for some time; now I have one.

amazing patina on old mirror

I love, love, love this old mirror; it has the most wonderful patina.

patina detail on old mirror

Here is a detail of the beautiful patina; see why I love it.

top of old wooden wheeled cartwheels for salvaged cart

And finally the most exciting find of all, an old (rotting), wooden  cart on wheels; well it’s not quit on wheels yet, but it will be once restored and then it will make a great coffee table in the cabin: So excited.


Cleaning My Empty Nest

empty nest imageThis week I finally found the time, energy and will to tackle a project I’ve put off far too long; cleaning out and organizing the closets of my house. As we transition from a full house to empty nesters we face the daunting, and often emotional task of paring down.  Rooms once filled with kids and the trappings of childhood are now quiet, occupied only by the shadows of the past and outgrown mementoes of youth.

 

kids memorabliaI actually tried to tackle this chore before, but as soon as I started sorting through the scraps of my children’s childhoods, their drawings, papers, photos and once treasured toys, I was ambushed, first by memories then by melancholy. So I abandoned the task, leaving the space in even more disarray than when I started, and instead I called the kids.

But over the years all our closets have slowly collected stuff, way too much stuff, so I decided it would be safer to start with my own space then work up to tackling, and facing, our empty nest.

My well-organized closet; it feels so spacious!

my organized closet

And my beautiful quilt closet; now I can enjoy my treasured textiles!

my organized quilt closet

A work in progress, yikes!

messy closet

Even though my closet clutter was hidden behind doors, the mess still weighed on me. Getting them clean and organized lifted the invisible weight that I wasn’t even aware I was carrying; I might even be ready to start on the kids room, or maybe I’ll just give them a call and visit awhile.


Lovely live edge table crafted from salvaged lumber

Lovely live edge table crafted from salvaged lumber

As anyone who follows my post knows, my oldest daughter married in May; yes the father of the bride is wearing a Hawiian shirt.  If you are new to Blue Antler Studio, welcome, and you can catch up on all the fun by looking at my earlier postings. joyful father-daughter dance to "brown-eyed girl"

Anyway she and her new husband just moved from their tiny  Brooklyn apartment into a beautiful loft. Like he did for our other daughter when she and her husband moved into their first house, my “talented hubby” crafted a beautiful table for the latest newlywed’s new home; and this weekend we made the two-day drive to Brooklyn to deliver them the table.

live edge table crafted from salvaged lumberThe table is not just your average table, it is a seven-foot slab of live-edge, spalted maple and it is a collaborative work of art between the Good Lord and my hubby! The benches are spalted hickory and reclaimed heart pine, left unsealed for a raw finish; unlike the table which my hubby hand rubbed to an incredible sheen. The legs and supports are constructed from galvanized pipes attached to industrial wheels.  It is perfectly suited for the hip young couple and their urban loft home.

live edge table crafted from salvaged lumber

 

The drive was long but colorful and scenic.

Driving into the city in our pickup truck took nerve, but hubby has nerve, so over the bridge we went.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 When we spotted one of the iconic water towers of Brooklyn,

brooklyn water tower

we knew we were getting close.

Finally….

we arrived at the lovely, spacious loft  – it is amazing!

And the table…

 live edge table crafted from salvaged lumber

 fit perfectly in its new home.

Over the weekend we gathered often around the table to enjoy great food and wine, conversation and laughter;  toasted the newlyweds and their new home; thanked the Good Lord for making such beautiful things as trees and family and cheese; and of course we bragged and bragged on my hubby and the table.


Two Twisted Tales

Yes there has been a very long (and frustrating) delay in my posting; no it’s not that I have been out fulfilling my dream of wandering through the ancient, art filled, cobblestone streets of the Old World, (you can bet I would be blogging that); and no it’s not because I have nothing to say, (those who know me can stop laughing); nor is it that I am just a lazy blogger, (although I do love an occasional lazy do-nothing day); the simple fact is that, as a blogging novice who can remember grooving to  Simon and Garfunkel, I have encountered some technical glitches that have me standing on a metaphoric bridge poised to toss my *>%##* computer into the murky – troubled waters – below!

Thankfully that moment was brief and it was time to turn my creative energy toward the deck railing project I’ve been deck rails made of twisted twigscontemplating. I am very pleased with the results and I’m excited to share it with you now.

I knew I wanted a wild organic look, what I didn’t know was how I would achieve it.  My first decision was to find the materials and for that I looked to my husband and the surrounding environment. My hubby and I hopped onto the quad and headed into the woods where we collected a large bundle of long twisted strands of wild grapevines.

We still needed material for the rail’s structure. For that we dug through the pile of sawmill waste slabs a neighbor brings to my dad to use as fire wood.

We found several, long, live-cut edge pieces we hoped would work perfectly.

creating a twisted twig railing

Then working like a creative team over thirty years in the making, my hubby and I constructed the beautiful, wild, twisting railing I had envisioned.

So with my creativity and perspective restored I was able to re-address the technical problems plaguing my efforts.  While all the issues are not yet resolved, I have at least un-twisted them enough to resume my passion of sharing and encouraging creativity.

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Edna’s Window Top Table

Well, it has been a long journey on the project I first cleaning and painting the old window for Edna's tablewrote about on the Blue Antler Studio (BAS), project share page.

But I’m  finally ready to update everyone who provided advice, suggestion or just good luck wishes. The project is now finished and sitting in my kitchen;  a counter height table made by repurposing an old window pane that I found in my dad’s barn.

First I had to clean, paint and come up with a technique.  Once I decided to use the window as a top for a table, the hard part began;  trying to decide what treatment I would use and getting it put together. Thankthe old window and porch post used to make Edna's tables to the Blue Antler Studio, project share, I had a lot of wonderful suggestions. 

I ended up using a vintage tablecloth  purchased at a yard sale; thanks to Diana, my sister, who spotted the tablecloth and knew that Kathy, the artist of BAS, would like it (sorry Kathy). It was also Diana who suggested that I use a nice piece of cloth for my project, and so the idea of the tablecloth as the treatment for my table was born.

vintage tablecloth and other supplies for making the old window into a tableThe colors are vivid, yellow, red, green and pink.  I sandwiched the tablecloth  between a piece of thin board and the window pane. But I didn’t stop there, thanks to Kathy’s advice,” think layers” and her suggestion to paint some of the design on the window pane; it gave it the depth it needed to bring it alive.   I used an old ornate column for the base, that was also found at a yard sale, and had been waiting for a new purpose.  I also have to thank my husband, Chuck, for  putting all the parts together, if not for him  the project would still be in a million pieces.  My sister-in-law Mary Ellen and my adopted sister, Sharon, were also there, giving moral support and keeping me from getting to wild with the painting, they kept saying,” keep it clean”.  The story would not be complete without the mentioning the one individual who always gives me the encouragement I need to keep going, thanks mom.

 old window turned into a high top table

066_0So the Blue Antler Studio has done it again, bringing the spirits of the ridge together; no matter if we are just out the road or hundreds of miles apart.   So thanks for everything; my project would not have been a success without the support and spirit of the ridge.   Edna

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Wonderful job Edna, it turned out beautiful!  I just want to add one more thank you. Since I’m sure that the lovely blinging creativity ring, that I noticed on your hand,  added inspiration, a thank you goes out to sister Jane.

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Blue Anter Studio Renovation

restoring old log house circa 1820s

That’s my man high up there on the scaffolding.

I mentioned in an earlier post that we discovered considerable critter damage in the ceilings of both the cabin and Blue Antler Studio. So, with repair absolutely necessary,  we’ve decided to take advantage of the situation and change things up a bit while we’re at it.  Work on the studio began by tearing down the ceiling; we striped away the paneling,  insulation and critter pooh, to expose the metal roofing.  The first step for the cabin  was to set up scaffolding. It sure didn’t seem so high thirty years ago,  when we were hoisting the logs up and into place.

Just one of the nests we found behind the ceiling, eeckes!

We want to recycle the tongue and grove; but first I’ll get it scraped, cleaned and primed.

The plan is to paint the ceiling and leave the rafters exposed.  Rigid foam board sandwiched between the tin and panelling will provide  insulation.  If you look closely you can see the expanding foam we sprayed into cracks for further insulation.

My hubby nailing up the ceiling while my brother cuts each piece to fit.

 It’s a lucky lady who has a handyman in her life, and I have two!

 Be sure to follow our progress!


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