Life on the creative side

Posts tagged “projects

Organic/Industrial chandelier

baby henry

While strolling through Brooklyn on a recent visit to see my daughter and my brand new grandbaby, we spotted a fallen limb from a large sycamore tree. It was lodged into the fencing surrounding the base of the tree and part of the sidewalk that had been heaved up by the expanding roots of the tree.  Although my daughter laughed as I pointed to the limb and said “We need that!” she not only worked it loose from the fencing but then carried it on her shoulder for more than ten blocks, back to her apartment.  I just want to note – strolling around with a large branch on your shoulder makes the normally aloof New Yorker  smile and engage in conversation.

found treasure, fallen limb

The branch had such a lovely organic shape and wonderful patina that we both immediately saw its potential for an amazing chandelier over their table, for which they have been in search.

Since hubby was due to arrive the following day we had him throw in some lighting supplies, including five Edison style light bulbs. Then a few days later…

dinning under the light

we were dinning under this beautiful  organic/industrial chandelier.

Finally we added a dimmer switch the chandelier could be adjusted lower for ambiance or raised higher for illumination.  Unfortunately we didn’t get good photos of the process but feel free to post any questions on the process  I would be happy to respond.

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Refurbished table with a sweet coastal charm

gold-leaf starfish for refurbished table with a sweet coastal charm

Rescued from the trash, now this refurbished table has a sweet coastal charm.Refurbished table with a sweet coastal charm

This  little black table had sat on my mother’s porch for years and was in pretty sad shape.  The legs were wobbly, trim was falling off,  the table surface was rotted and one of the legs was sticking up through the top. But the form was so lovely and the paint had a great chippy appeal. So when she asked my dad to toss it out, I was there to catch and rescue it.

littly wobbly chippy black table to be refurbished

I wanted to keep the original top but it was just to far gone. Once I accepted that the top was too far gone, and hubby promised to help me create a new one,  I turned  my disappointment into a search for a creative solution.

making a new top for little shabby black table

I knew I wanted to keep the chippy character of the legs and shelf  so the new top would have to play well its shabby base. Ultimately I decided to add a little contrast, creamy white paint crackled over a blue base-coat.

cream white crackled over blue for refurbished table with a sweet coastal charm

 To marry the new top to the old base I added some of the same blue and white to the base but leaving evidence of the original black.

dry brushed blue and white over chippy black paint on refurbished table

Then for an extra twist I stitched a border of blue yarn around the top. Finally I applied a large, free-hand starfish in gold-leaf and the sad little table was transformed into a new charming table with a coastal vibe.

gold-leaf starfish for refurbished table with a sweet coastal charm

starfish table

With a little creativity and work, the sad little rescue table was transformed into a lovely, refurbished table with a sweet coastal charm.

For more creativity check out:

twig study

be different act normal


Antique headboard repurposed into a beautiful creativity-board

creativity board made from antique headboard

Antique headboard repurposed into a beautiful creativity-board.

 creativity board detail with business card

While cleaning out her barn my sister found a forgotten old headboard in the loft. She thought I might be able to find a new “repurpose” for it; she knows me well.  I have been wanting a creativity center for the studio; a place to display creative inspiration and project plans. A vague idea had been percolating in my mind; a message board, but on a grand scale. The dusty wooden headboard was the right scale and had a graceful form, perfect for my creativity board.

antique headboard repurposed into a creativity/message board

With the help of hubby the found headboard was redesigned into a useful, lovely focal point in the studio.

hubby cutting out plywood for creativity board

Here’s how we repurposed an antique headboard into a lovely creativity board.

Using the headboard as the  template we cut 1/4 inch plywood into a smaller version of the headboard by trimming four inches off the pattern all the way around.

tracing headboard for template

hubby helping with creativity board 2

I placed a layer of quilt batting over the plywood and held that in place with a layer of burlap which we held in place with staples on the back side of the plywood.

cotton layer of creativity board

burlap layer on creativity board

Next we covered it with a vintage chenille bedspread, again stapled to the back. Staples were also used to attach the cotton string, snuggly but not taut, that we crisscrossed across the front, over the chenille. Where  the strings crossed each other, I stapled the intersection down into the plywood, creating a tuft. Then the plywood was glued to the headboard, which had been painted a soft white.

vintage button on creativity board

We applied construction adhesive to the back of the plywood, carefully centered on the headboard and weighted it down for several hours. To add strength we added screws through the back of the headboard into the plywood (making sure they did not protrude out the front side of the plywood. I finished the project with buttons over the intersections of the string.

jar of vintage buttons

Now the creativity board, hangs in the studio, covered with creative possibilities.

creativity board made from antique headboard

headboard repurposed into creativity board

I & E Button

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show and tell fridays

the shabby nest

craftberry bush link party

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Creative gathering: how to make paper

how to make paper

Hallelujah! Finally, my studio is restored and reclaimed! After months of repair and restoration, that threw my studio into disarray, I have my creative escape back.

 

cabin studio

 

I held a gathering to celebrate and the creative activity was paper-making.

 

how to make paper gathering at blue antler studio

 

Three of my five sisters – kindred spirits all – joined me in the celebration and the creative process of making paper.

 

making paper with kindred spirits in the studio

 

Having made paper with my small children, who are now ages 23-30 (admittedly a while ago),  I knew it was a simple, fun process. But I Googled “how to make paper” just to refresh my memory; it returned intimidating results with complicated, multi-step instructions. So I decided to turn off the computer and go with what I remembered about the process. After gathering supplies and putting on our creativity rings (a tradition among my sisters) we got started.

Supplies

Recyclable paper – torn or shredded (we had newspaper, junk mail, old magazines and paper bags).

Extra newspaper (blotting paper) and old towels – for blotting out water

An electric blender

Rolling pen

Chalk powder or crushed chalk pieces – for color

Flowers, leaves etc.

Water

Large container for water bath

A frame/screen sieve: This is a simple tool similar to what gold miners would use to pan for gold (the frame can be different sizes but need to be a few inches deep with the top side open and the bottom side covered with a taut, fine screen or sheer fabric) and must fit into the water bath container.

Hubby made a frame/screen sieve for each of us out of scrap 2×2 lumber and an old, torn window screen. For each sieve he cut the 2×2 lumber into two – 9 inch long pieces and two – 12 inch pieces (the size can be whatever you want and determines the size of the finished paper, but it must fit into the container used for the water bath).

Using glue, screws and the cut lumber pieces he constructed a simple, rectangular frame.

Then using the assembled frame as a pattern, he cut two pieces of screen, one slightly larger than the frame (which he stapled tautly across the bottom of the frame to create the sieve), the second piece of screen he cut to the size of the inner dimensions of the frame; on this piece he left 4×4 inch tabs on each end of the screen. The screen with the tabs fit snugly inside the frame/sieve with the tabs sticking up above the edge of the frame so we could use them to gently lift the paper out of the frame. (By using the extra screen with tabs to remove the newly made paper from the frame/sieve to dry, it allows you to make more paper with one frame more quickly: this step can be skipped and the newly made paper can be left in the frame/sieve to dry)

optional – creativity ring :)

 

making paper in our creativity rings

 

Step 1: shred recycle paper in blender adding enough water to make a thick soupy pulp (at this time you can add chalk for color, flowers or glitter etc.)

 

paper making using a kitchen blender

Step 2: fill water bath container with water

Step 3: place screen with tab inside the frame/screen sieve (make sure tabs are sticking up and out of the frame); place the frame/sieve into the water bath barely  submerging the screen; pour blended paper pulp into the frame/screen sieve until the screen is completely covered with a thin layer of pulp; gently swirl the frame in the water to evenly spread the pulp over the screen; at this point you can place pressed objects into the pulp, make sure there is some pulp overlapping the object.

water bath stage of making paper

 

beautifully embellished hand made paper

 

Step 4: lift the frame from the water bath, let drain and place on towel or layer of blotting paper and blot gently.

 

making paper using recycled newspaper

 

Step 5: using tabs on the screen gently lift the paper from the frame and place the screen with the new paper onto hard surface covered with a layer of blotting paper and cover with more blotting paper, gently roll with rolling pen (using no pressure) to express more water, then carefully peel off the blotting paper.

Step 6: carefully transfer the new paper to a drying rack with the newly made paper down and carefully peel away the screen with tabs.

papermaking, releasing from screen (2).JPG 2

 

We used another old screen as a drying rack.

 

making paper embellished with flowers and drying in the sun

It was a wonderful, creative gathering.

 

making paper gathering in the studio

And another moment for my collection.

Check out  the following link for more great sites full of inspiration

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Old Chair, New Look

Aren’t these lovely? One old chair, gets a new look with paint and vintage table clothe.

Old chairs to refurbish

I have to start by confessing that I am not an expert on upholstery, in fact I’ve never upholstered anything before.  I have made slip covers but never have I stripped naked a piece of furniture and re-clothed it in a new look – but there’s a first time for everything. So I started carefully  pulling off fabric.

striping down old chair to refurbish

I found old cotton/horse hair/straw stuffing, burlap, metal  upholstery grip-strips (my terminology, probably not the correct term) and springs inside of my old chair .

Inside of old chair to be refurbish

Stripping off the old was easy, deciding what the new would be was more difficult.

lovely collection of fabric

I’m kind’a vibing pom-poms.

lov'n pom-poms

Finally I decided on using a vintage tablecloth (a cutter one), a soft warm white paint and pom-poms.

old chair new look with paint and vintage tablecloth

Old chair, new look

Check out this blog for more creativity

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Lovely Quilt Cube Side Table

Lovely Quilt Cube Side Table:

Basic box store foam cube up-scaled into this lovely, rolling,  quilt-cube side table.

quilt cube

Another empty-nest leftover transformed from this-

quilt cube foam blockquilt cube rolling base

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

to this-

quilt cube in room

Scraps of vintage textiles camouflage tears and blemishes in the cutter quilt slip-cover

quilt cube detail

while pieces of salvaged wooden planks with lovely distressed paint make the base.

quilt cube on wheels

Simple wheels finished the project.

 

 for more inspiration visit…

1-Funky_Junks_Party_Junk_link_party.29-AM

vintage inspiration bif


Vintage Vibe For Box Store Shelving

Vintage vibe for box store shelving

. Vintage vibe for box store shelving

As an empty-nester I can verify that when  the chicks leave the nest they leave it far from empty. Each time one of our little darlings set out on their own, Hubby and I found ourselves the keeper stuff – unwanted, but wanted stuff; treasures of childhood, mementos of college days and  a menagerie of mismatched  furniture  usually in rough shape.  These shelves fall into the last category.

box store shelf update before

But after a little creative restyling they look like this…

box store shelf update finished

In fact they turned out so beautiful they were snatched up on the first day of my fall sale.

DIY:

Although the shelves were in good shape, they looked exactly like what they were, box store shelves. So I took sand paper to them and roughed them up enough so paint would  adhere. I then gave them a coat of a warm white paint and  sanded them again, taking off some of the white paint (more of the paint came off than I had intended or usually want, but this time it looked right so I went with it). Next step was to mellow the paint and any fresh wood exposed from sanding by coating the entire shelf with a dark stain (applied with a brush then quickly wiped off with a rag). Once it was completely dry I coated the shelves with a flat, clear sealer.

Meanwhile I took some vintage wallpaper I have been holding onto, cut it into strips as  wide as the inside depth of the shelves and  as long as the shelves were wide plus  and extra foot or so. With a  spray adhesive I covered the bake of the paper with fabric (I used remnants of old sheets) and trimmed the fabric to the size of the paper. This gave strength to the otherwise delicate paper.  I carefully wove the lined paper over and under the slates of the shelving. To finish I trimmed off the excess paper and secured the edges to the underside of the framing with furniture tacks.

This project turned out so beautiful,, I might have to make another with the remaining shelves in our keepers stash.

 


A Cabin Kitchen Remodel

country french inspired kitchen island remodel with antique rain gutter wine rack

We are finally finishing up or winding down our summer projects at the cabin and studio.  Actually my studio has been commandeered for storage and work space until hubby’s workshop/barn is completed. Fortunately not having my studio hasn’t been too much of an issue, as I’ve been so busy with house and yard projects over the last few months that I haven’t needed it; come fall however, it will be a different story. But now, as promised, is one of the projects that we have completed.

My kitchen started out last summer like this.

punched tin pine cabinet

Now, as it should be, it is my favorite room in the cabin.

Cabin kitchen remodel

Our first step was painting the bead-board ceiling a creamy white to help light reflect around the room. We then rearranged the appliances and added some old heart-pine cabinets that hubby had made almost thirty years ago for another house.  Because the cabinets were not designed for this space, we created open shelving, with painted bead-board backing (a wonderful green), to fill in the empty spaces. I loaded the shelves with lovely things – all mice proof of course, as this is an old cabin in the country.

Open shelving in farm kitchen

I love that all the textiles in the space are mismatched; my sister donated light airy curtains for the windows; vintage embroidered pillowcases cover the chair cushions; instead of doors under the counter we used French inspired table clothes as curtains; different patterned tablecloths also flank the sliding door which leads out to the new deck with twisted vine rails, which leads to the new patio…but all that will be in another post.

 

Cabin kitchen remodel with tablecloths as curtains

 Light airy curtains and landscape painting by kathry t lundberg, lighten a kitchen

The counter top and back-splash is walnut from an old tree that fell on the home place years ago and has been stored in my sister’s barn; Hubby roughed up the surface and rounded the edges to give it an aged look, then sealed it with food safe oil.  The sink was in the structure when we found it and was moved along with the logs to the current location. A few years ago hubby built the sink cabinet and I painted and finished it to look like an old piece of furniture (what a team we make)

cabin kitchen sink

The island was constructed from the very first piece of woodworking hubby made for the cabin, all those years ago; a pine cabinet with punched tin doors perched high on tall legs.  We removed the legs; painted and distressed the whole thing; added reclaimed porch posts and a couple of salvaged angle brackets from an old farm-house to support the new shelving and bar height counter. Finally we topped it off with a beautiful piece of marble given to us by a friend.  I finished the bar shelf with a primitive painting of the houses along the ridge. Hubby even put power in the island so at this Christmas’s tree trimming party I won’t be crowded in the corner with my back to the revelers while preparing the grilled cheese sandwiches.

french inspired kitchen island

distressed French blue kitchen cabinet doors

recycled porch posts for kitchen island

primitive folk art painting on kitchen counter by kathryn t lundberg

folk art painting on kitchen island counter

The lighting is the final project; I’m just waiting for the perfect fixture to find its way to me.

Country French inspired Cabin kitchen remodel with antique rain gutter wine rack

 vintage farmhouse

 


Summer Projects Around the Cabin and Studio

pine cabinet before being repurposed

As I write this post I’m sitting on my cabin porch on rocky round.  The summer has been hot and volatile but this morning the air is cool and fresh.  For the past month hubby and I have been supper busy around the studio and cabin. We have been finishing up the kitchen remodel, creating a gravel patio, renovating the guest loft, revamping the garden beds and most ambitiously building a workshop/barn for my hubby.

I’m posting a few pics of the ongoing projects, but I will post more details of the projects as they are completed.

We are refurbishing and re-purposing this old pine cabinet hubby made 25 years ago.

pine cabinet before being repurposed

It now looks like this…

french inspired kitchen island made from recycled cabinet

I’m loving it!

The space between the studio and the cabin is being transformed into a gathering area; when completed it will house a fire-pit, chairs and a gorgeous, ten foot, live-edge table! Hubby has a lot on his honey-do list.

I even got to drive the bobcat-too much fun!

bob-cat used to grade patio

And hubby is working hard; looking good honey.

digging a trench for plumbing

Notice the rock wall around the garden, I’m learning all sorts of new skills.

gravel paito

And here’s hubby’s new shop/barn.

building a workshop/barn

I will share the finished projects as they are completed.


Love’n The Versatile Succulent

Ever since my daughter chose to use succulents in her wedding, I have been in love with these beautiful, durable plants.

succulent wedding bouquet

 

succulents as table decor

From bouquets, to planters, to the garden, even to the garden wall, their versatility makes them perfect for so many applications.

succulents in the garden

To add a splash of eclectic fun to my window, I recently used a colorful olive oil tin and re-purposed it into a sill sized planter. First I used a belt sander to grind off the top of the tin. Then using hot soapy water I cleaned the empty tin. Next, I punched a few holes into the bottom and filled it half way to the top with pea gravel, before filling it the rest of the way with a cactus potting mixture. Finally I added the succulents and finished by covering the soil with pea gravel.

succulents planted in re-purposed olive oil tin

Spread the love – plant some succulents!

for more inspiration check out the party…

collage 5-1-13 2

http://www.commonground-do.com/


Super Simple Rug DIY Project

spray painted rug in living room

I have a super simple DIY project to share.  Part of life on the ridge is dealing with tracked in mud.  I tried situating a bench on the porch,  to sit and take off muddy or dirty boots, but we county folk tend to wipe off our  boots, not take them off.

rustic bench on cabin porch

Most of the time this is fine, but  in the spring the mud can be maddening! So I decided to try a rug. I knew it would have to be durable;  indoor/outdoor durable.  I already had a decent quality porch rug, but it was plain and kind of boring. Could it be made living room quality with a little  paint?…yes!

For this project you’ll need – A rug (indoor/outdoor, Berber or low pile loop), paint, painter’s tape and a ruler or tape measure.

I started by marking off lines of varying width and taped them off.

(I chose to do stripes but I also considered putting them on the diagonal as well as replicating the studio floor’s large harlequin diamonds – your rug  your way)

harlequin diamond painted on floor

Whatever design you decide on,  after taping out the pattern it’s time to paint: I used regular ole’ acrylic spray paint but you could use liquid paints and roll  or brush on your pattern. Final step – remove the tape, and…

Voila!

spray painted rug in living room

I said it was simple, now go paint a rug!


A Pin Cushion Made From Fabric Scraps and Vintage Dish

pin cushion made from vintage table cloth and white dish

pin cushion made from vintage table cloth and white dishVintage pin cushion

Recently I had a friend mention that she didn’t have a pin cushion so I thought I would take a few minutes and make one for her.  Since she loves the shabby chic style and has an affinity for old textiles, as do I,  I thought repurposed materials would fit her style aesthetic. Using a little milk glass dish, some scrap from a vintage table-cloth, a stocking and a hand-full of cedar shavings, I created this sweet, shabby chic pin cushion.

This is such a simple project and no sewing is required!

The supplies needed: Scissors, rubber band, a piece of yarn or string, old nylon stockings,  fine wood shavings (you could use cotton stuffing instead but I like the feel, the old fashion quality and aroma of  cedar shavings), some fabric and a small container like my milk glass dish or tea-cup. (construction adhesive optional)

supplies gathered to make pin cushion

Cut the fabric into a large circle; size will depend on the size of the dish, but a nine-inch diameter worked for my smallish container.

stocking used to make pin cushion

Cut the stocking six or so inches from the toe and stuff the toe with wood shavings until you have formed a ball large enough to fill the container and tie off the opening.

making the pin cushion

Place the stuffed stocking in the center of the fabric circle and wrap the fabric up and around the stocking ball, pull it taut and tie off tail using the rubber band. Tie off again using the string or yarn.

 making pin cushionfabric tied around filling of pin cushion

 Fan out the fabric;  smoothing and pulling it evenly back over the bottom of the ball. Wedge the ball into the container, a dab of good glue such as construction adhesive will hold it securely.

white dish used to make pin cushion

And you will have created a lovely little pin cushion

pin cushion made from vintage table cloth and white dish

Now gather up the supplies and surprise some special with a unique pin cushion.

for more great inspiration visit

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Architectural Salvage

My hubby and I recently attended a lovely, out-of-town wedding.  Since we were there for the weekend we had some time to spend with each other; and hubby surprised me with the perfect outing – a trip to an architectural salvage yard. It was a wonderful surprise and we had a great time: I even found a few treasures (imagine that).

archictectural salvage yard

After spending the morning digging through pieces and remnants of the past, we drove to the wedding with treasures poking out of the trunk, tied down with twine, and filling the back seat of my car.  We got a few stares, laughs and Beverly Hillbilly comments, but of course no one who knew us was surprised.

rusty metal candle sconce for garden accent

A rusty metal candle sconce. I think this will work great in my garden.

large paper dispenser

 I’ve needed a large paper roll dispenser at the studio for some time; now I have one.

amazing patina on old mirror

I love, love, love this old mirror; it has the most wonderful patina.

patina detail on old mirror

Here is a detail of the beautiful patina; see why I love it.

top of old wooden wheeled cartwheels for salvaged cart

And finally the most exciting find of all, an old (rotting), wooden  cart on wheels; well it’s not quit on wheels yet, but it will be once restored and then it will make a great coffee table in the cabin: So excited.


Our Booth Of Eclectic Home Furnishings And Collectables!

booth at renninger's extravaganza

 

booth at renninger's extravaganzaAfter a very long day our booth is ready and we are so pleased with the way it looks.  We had a lot of positive feedback and several sales offers. While our closest neighbor comes across a little abrasive at times, I think the elderly man and his wife are probably nicer than their first impression would indicate; we certainly hope so, but tomorrow we’ll have a stash of sangria on hand, just in case we need to calm our nerves and shore up our patience.

booth at renninger's extravaganza

Check back to hear how it goes.


I Love Old Dishes! Even Broken – Mosaic

vintage dishes in cabinet

I love old dishes, the time mellowed hues and crackled glaze gives them a commonality that makes my miss-matched collection work beautiful as a setting. Vintage plates and bowls can be found everywhere from yard sales and flea markets to antique shops; and they are often inexpensive. Even if broke, which happens from time to time at my house, their beauty can still be enjoyed and appreciated through repurposing.

table setting of vintage mix-matched dishes

After one of my favorite plates broke, I used the broken pieces as tile and created a sweet little lazy Susan.         Broken plate mosaic lazy susan  broken plate mosaic as lazy susan

 I used the decorative center of a broken saucer as a design element in a mosaic top I crafted for a mid-century wire stand.

mid-century stand with saucer mosaic

Remember that some of the glazes used in vintage dishes may contain lead so test them before using. I sometimes use the old dishes like chargers, paired with clear dishes so their beauty is still visible while food is kept safely away from possible lead contamination.

http://www.fda.gov/Food/FoodborneIllnessContaminants/Metals/ucm233281.htm

Happy collecting!


Repurposed Apple Crate

With the arrival of the new year, Lisa and I have begun our final push to get ready for the upcoming antique extravaganza. I just finished this project and I am so pleased with the outcome, I had to take some time to share it with you.

close up of repurposed pink apple box into sidetable

The little side-table started life as a primitive wooden apple crate.  When I found this little treasure, the paper label had mostly peeled away, but what was left of it was lovely; and pink paint, flaking from the wood inside and out, had mellowed to a wonderfully soft hue.

wooden apple box label

I gently scrubbed away the years of dust and grime, careful not to destroy anymore of the label and to remove only the flakiest paint.  Then I added, (well hubby added), caster wheels, a wooden shelf with old green paint and finally an overall coat of poly.

repurposed  pink apple box side table

Isn’t it adorable!


We’re Booked At The Renninger’s Antique Extravaganza!

Its official, we’re committed.  This weekend we rented our space for the antique extravaganza in January http://renningers.com.   It’s the sale that Lisa and I have been moving toward with all the repurposing projects we’ve been working on for the past few months.

We attendant this season’s first extravaganza to gather information.  We decided on an area of the show that we would like to be located, observed what items seemed to be popular and of course shopped.

If you’re going to be in the central Florida area January 20, 21 and 22, stop by and say hello.


Lovely live edge table crafted from salvaged lumber

Lovely live edge table crafted from salvaged lumber

As anyone who follows my post knows, my oldest daughter married in May; yes the father of the bride is wearing a Hawiian shirt.  If you are new to Blue Antler Studio, welcome, and you can catch up on all the fun by looking at my earlier postings. joyful father-daughter dance to "brown-eyed girl"

Anyway she and her new husband just moved from their tiny  Brooklyn apartment into a beautiful loft. Like he did for our other daughter when she and her husband moved into their first house, my “talented hubby” crafted a beautiful table for the latest newlywed’s new home; and this weekend we made the two-day drive to Brooklyn to deliver them the table.

live edge table crafted from salvaged lumberThe table is not just your average table, it is a seven-foot slab of live-edge, spalted maple and it is a collaborative work of art between the Good Lord and my hubby! The benches are spalted hickory and reclaimed heart pine, left unsealed for a raw finish; unlike the table which my hubby hand rubbed to an incredible sheen. The legs and supports are constructed from galvanized pipes attached to industrial wheels.  It is perfectly suited for the hip young couple and their urban loft home.

live edge table crafted from salvaged lumber

 

The drive was long but colorful and scenic.

Driving into the city in our pickup truck took nerve, but hubby has nerve, so over the bridge we went.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 When we spotted one of the iconic water towers of Brooklyn,

brooklyn water tower

we knew we were getting close.

Finally….

we arrived at the lovely, spacious loft  – it is amazing!

And the table…

 live edge table crafted from salvaged lumber

 fit perfectly in its new home.

Over the weekend we gathered often around the table to enjoy great food and wine, conversation and laughter;  toasted the newlyweds and their new home; thanked the Good Lord for making such beautiful things as trees and family and cheese; and of course we bragged and bragged on my hubby and the table.


A Story About Hubby

 I want to tell you a story. This story began several years ago, when my babies were really babies, and my young family was spending a long weekend at a friend’s condo on the beach. My hubby, as he has most of our married life, had to work half a day on Saturday, so the plan was for him to join us in the early afternoon.  But as the kids played in the sand and the sun drifted further and further toward the west, there was no sign of hubby.  Back in the ole’ days when the world was not tethered together by cell phones all I could do was wait and grow more and more impatient.  Just as I was about to pack up, he came hurrying across the beach, still wearing his work clothes.

 Like a little boy bursting with a secret he could hold no longer, my hubby sat down in the sand beside me. Barely aware of the kids crawling over him in their daddy’s home euphoria, and seemingly oblivious to my annoyance, he began…

  “There was an ad in the paper for reclaimed lumber”, he paused, I’m not sure if was for effect or to gauge my mood. Then he rambled on excitedly about an old man, a garage stacked full like a warehouse, something about cypress maybe pecking cypress, walnut or heart pine: Whatever, I knew where the story was headed so I finally interrupted with “How much did you spend?”   He fought a sheepish grin as he held up four fingers. “You spent four hundred dollars on a pile of old wood” I asked accusingly. The sheepish grin took total control as he slowly shook his head no. “You spent four THOUSAND dollars!” I all but shouted.

He went on to assure me that it was a great deal and he would get more for the lumber than he had paid and still have extra for projects.  Well all these years later he has yet to sell a single board foot; not that there haven’t been buyers, but all have failed his screening process.  Through the years he has however shared his treasure with like-minded lumber lovers with  plans deemed worthy; and of course our beloved beach house has lovely cypress doors and window trim, an amazing handcrafted fireplace mantle and a family sized farm-house table for gathering around. This one I have to give him – you did good hubby.

Wine rack created by hubby from salvaged wood…

 The beautiful trim crafted from hubby’s beloved lumber…

 Family gathered around a table designed and built by hubby.


Little Table Makeover With Mosaic

My sister-in-law is moving into her new home and fortunately for me she is using the opportunity to thin out or replace some of her things.  This little table is one of the items that did not make the cut to move on to the new place, so it found itself in my studio waiting for a makeover.

Umm, what to do?

Simple, sweet lines…

not in love with the glass top, seems a little dated…

oh what to do with you, little table?

What?

Mosaic!

Of course!

lilly pad mosaic table

small mosaic top table

Thanks Carol.

I’ve joined the party over at

ModMixButtonsmall2


More Fun With Repurposing

 

More treasures for our upcoming sale.  Now along with the chair we re-upholstered in a soft plaid flannel, the room divider we created from an old picture screen and yellow chenille remnant,  a redesigned lamp and shade and  a re-finished end table embellished with a gold leaf starfish; we now have a set of shelves an old painting and an oak table ready for our booth.

 

I’m particularly pleased with the set of shelves that began life as slated multi colored cubes in a modern design.  But after some paint and creative use of old wallpaper, they have been reborn into a unique set of shelves that exude   vintage charm within its modern lines. 

 ← Before

                                                                                               After ↓

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I painted this painting thirty years ago on a canvas board.  Over the years the canvas began to separate from the board so I went ahead and peeled it completely off. Then after serendipitously laying it on an old beat up table with pealing paint, I fell in love with the look and had the idea of mounting the old canvas on weathered paneling.  So my dear “doer” hubby put together a board constructed of tongue and grove boards and mounted them on a piece of thin plywood.  After scuffing and beating charater and age onto the surface, I painted, crackled and sanded them into a beautifully distressed condition.  Finally, using upholstery tacks, I mounted the canvas to the panels.

                                                  ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

 This old oak table had sat in my dad’s barn for more years than I can remember.  The veneer had long ago peeled away and the base, held together by wire twisted around the pedestal by some long ago owner, was coming loose from both the table top and the legs; it was in rough shape.  First we reinforced the weakened structure then coated it with soft oatmeal white paint.  Then we glued a colorful remnant of outdoor fabric to the top, trimmed the edge with some antique rick rack and coated the whole thing with several layers of polymer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Refurbishing with Paint, Stitching and Silver-Leaf; A Lovely Little Table to Treasure,

I grabbed this little wobbly table right out of my dad’s hands as he reared back to toss it into the dumpster, now you know something is in sad shape if  it’s not worth the space it takes up in a barn full of junk! Anyway that was a few years back and since then it has lived by mytt's barn bed, on the porch and finally in an out building.  But with Lisa and me looking for items for the booth we plan to set up in January, I pulled it out and took a fresh look at its possibilities.

The black paint concealed the colors but not the ragged texture of the multiple layers of paint globbed on beneath. The legs were loose, very loose; one had actually broken through the table top which had also shortened one side considerably. It was in sad shape, but there was just something sweet about its form. So after my hubby stabilized the top and legs, the best that could be done, I started to work painting. I decided to use a dry brush technique that embraced its primitive nature; and I chose a beautiful blue that puts me in mind of the sea.

Lisa had been looking for a project to try a technique she had seen somewhere that involves stitching on wood.  With that in mind we developed a plan to transform the little ugly table into a beautiful home accessory.

Using a new piece of plywood cut to fit the top of the table, we painted on layers of paint that we then distressed and crackled.  We stitched on a border using a beautiful multi colored yarn and applied a single starfish using gold leaf.

This is what we ended up with…

a lovely little table to treasure.

How to stitch on wood:

We drilled holes about 1 1/2 inches from the edge of the wood using a 3/16 inch bit.  The needle was a six-inch piece of thin, flexible wire folded in half and, using pliers, pinched at the fold to make it small enough to fit through the drilled holes. Sliding an end of the yarn onto the makeshift needle and starting on the underneath side, I pulled the yarn up through a hole and down through the next hole, creating a running stitch; tying off the ends on the underneath side.  To compensate for the bulk of the yarn on the bottom of the stitched piece, we glued very thin strips of plywood along the underneath edge and a couple of strips along the center. Finally, we applied glue along the strips we had added and attached the completed piece to the table top; clamping in place until set.

 

 

 


Having Fun With Creative Repurposing

chenille room divider

Lisa and I are happily busy these days collaborating on a new exciting project.  As I don’t have the resources to open a real brick and mortar shop, which is my dream, Lisa has agreed to join me in setting up a booth at a local antique/craft fair in January. Our husbands think it’s an excuse, as if we need one, to collect more junk.  But really part of the motivation is to thin out some of our junk, like having a big fancy yard sale; OK, maybe some shopping will be involved. 

 

However, after taking a look around our homes, we were reminded how much we struggle to with part with our precious junk/treasures. So far the things we are willing to let go all need drastic styling and repurposing to make them worthy of our stylish display.

 

Of course, and this will not surprise anyone, I took a trip through my dad’s barn;  as always, I was not disappointed.  I found several things that will fit the modern, airy, causal cottage vibe we’re channeling. Again much of the items will need some work to fit our style vision, but with a little elbow grease,  paint and fabric and a lot of creativity the random pieces will meld into a cohesive, beautiful collection.

 

Some before /after and in the process.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Here’s a sneak peek at how the look of our booth is taking shape…

 

 

 

 

 

 


Edna’s Window Top Table

Well, it has been a long journey on the project I first cleaning and painting the old window for Edna's tablewrote about on the Blue Antler Studio (BAS), project share page.

But I’m  finally ready to update everyone who provided advice, suggestion or just good luck wishes. The project is now finished and sitting in my kitchen;  a counter height table made by repurposing an old window pane that I found in my dad’s barn.

First I had to clean, paint and come up with a technique.  Once I decided to use the window as a top for a table, the hard part began;  trying to decide what treatment I would use and getting it put together. Thankthe old window and porch post used to make Edna's tables to the Blue Antler Studio, project share, I had a lot of wonderful suggestions. 

I ended up using a vintage tablecloth  purchased at a yard sale; thanks to Diana, my sister, who spotted the tablecloth and knew that Kathy, the artist of BAS, would like it (sorry Kathy). It was also Diana who suggested that I use a nice piece of cloth for my project, and so the idea of the tablecloth as the treatment for my table was born.

vintage tablecloth and other supplies for making the old window into a tableThe colors are vivid, yellow, red, green and pink.  I sandwiched the tablecloth  between a piece of thin board and the window pane. But I didn’t stop there, thanks to Kathy’s advice,” think layers” and her suggestion to paint some of the design on the window pane; it gave it the depth it needed to bring it alive.   I used an old ornate column for the base, that was also found at a yard sale, and had been waiting for a new purpose.  I also have to thank my husband, Chuck, for  putting all the parts together, if not for him  the project would still be in a million pieces.  My sister-in-law Mary Ellen and my adopted sister, Sharon, were also there, giving moral support and keeping me from getting to wild with the painting, they kept saying,” keep it clean”.  The story would not be complete without the mentioning the one individual who always gives me the encouragement I need to keep going, thanks mom.

 old window turned into a high top table

066_0So the Blue Antler Studio has done it again, bringing the spirits of the ridge together; no matter if we are just out the road or hundreds of miles apart.   So thanks for everything; my project would not have been a success without the support and spirit of the ridge.   Edna

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Wonderful job Edna, it turned out beautiful!  I just want to add one more thank you. Since I’m sure that the lovely blinging creativity ring, that I noticed on your hand,  added inspiration, a thank you goes out to sister Jane.

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